Big Little Lies (HBO) starring Nicole Kidman, Reese Witherspoon, & Shailene Woodley

NOTE: This is a SPOILER-FREE review. 

[1] I don’t know why, but I found this show completely and utterly mesmerizing, all the way down to the music and cinematography. Everyone involved in this from top to bottom hit it out of the park.

[2] Give it a chance, as I haven’t been a fan of Nicole Kidman until now; she is amazing and such a talented actress in this series. 

[3] Extremely intelligently written, superb acting, great dialogues, characters on point, great music…

[4] I recommend everyone to go see it. It was an OUTSTANDING commentary touching on feminism, sisterhood, parenthood, love and compassion. 

-Excerpts from IMDB reviews

I was surprised by HOW much I liked this (limited) series. There MAY be a Season 2, BUT (from few things I’ve heard/read) don’t get your hopes up. This show is based on a book of the same title by an Australian novelist Liane Moriarty; however, the setting here is gorgeous, suburban, and liberal-minded town (Monterey, CA). The show focuses on the lives of several women (incl. homemakers, career women, single moms) whose children are attending 1st grade together at a public high school. Their husbands and (potential) partners are present, BUT secondary characters; the ladies (rare for TV) take the lead!  

The creator of HBO’s Big Little Lies is lawyer-turned-screenwriter David E. Kelley (Ally McBeal; Boston Legal; Chicago Hope, etc.)  Some of you know him as the long-time husband of actress Michelle Pfeiffer; they have two kids together. Nicole Kidman and Reese Witherspoon BOTH act and serve as producers of the show, as does Canadian director Jean-Marc Vallee (Dallas Buyers Club; Wild; The Young Victoria). I think Vallee has an eye for beauty, BUT is also NOT afraid to shy away from reality (incl. portraying dark/troubling moments in a natural fashion).

Madeline Mackenzie (Witherspoon) is an energetic, chatty, and VERY proud homemaker w/ two daughters- a 15 y.o. (recently growing distant) w/ her first husband and a 6 y.o. (who loves music) w/ her second husband, Ed (Adam Scott). They have a lovely beachfront home and are solidly upper middle-class, thanks to Ed’s successful IT business. Madeline works P/T at the local community theater. Her best friend is even wealthier; Celeste Wright (Kidman) is NOT only classically beautiful and elegant, she was a VERY successful lawyer who became a stay-at-home-mom (SAHM) to twin 6 y.o. boys. She is married to a somewhat younger business executive, Perry (Alexander Skarsgard), who travels often and likes to get his way. There is a new mom in town- Jane Chapman (Shailene Woodley); she is nice yet also reserved, still in her 20s, and has a sweet 6 y.o. son. Jane moved from a nearby town and is NOT from an affluent background; she is looking for a job in the accounting field.

Madeline takes an instant liking to Jane and introduces her to the town, their children’s school, and everyday dramas that result from interactions w/ fellow moms in the community. Career woman Renata Klein (Laura Dern) and Madeline are NOT afraid to let people know that they are frenemies (or nemesis?)- they lock horns often and BOTH have stubborn personalities. Renata knows that the SAHMs look at her differently; she serves on several company boards, yet also seeks to control things at her daughter’s school. One of the ONLY women who seems to be low-drama is Bonnie Carlson (Zoe Kravitz- daughter of singer Lenny Kravitz and actress Lisa Bonet). She is a free-spirited black woman (in her late 20s) who works as a yoga teacher; she is married to Madeline’s ex-husband, Nathan, w/ whom she has a 6 y.o. daughter.  

 

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Vertigo (1958) starring James Stewart & Kim Novak

Hitch was quite upset at he failure of the film when it was first released; he blamed this on James Stewart for “looking too old” (nearly 50 y.o.) to attract large audiences. Bernard Herrmann’s musical score was inspired by Wagner’s Tristan & Isolde which is also about doomed love. This film was the first to use computer graphics. The second-unit cameraman (most likely) invented the famous zoom/out and track/in shot to convey the sense of vertigo to the audience. 

Let’s not probe too deeply into these matters, Kim. It’s only a movie. -Director Alfred Hitchcock explained to actress Kim Novak (when she asked for more info on her character’s motivation during a scene)

John “Scottie” Ferguson (Stewart) is a middle-aged/retired/detective who suffers from acrophobia. He is a bachelor who is still good friends w/ his former fiance, Midge Wood (Barbara Bel Geddes), who works in fashion merchandising (being an artist). An old friend from college, Gavin Elster (Tom Helmore), calls Scottie to his office (in the San Francisco shipyards) and asks him to follow his wife, Madeleine (Kim Novak). Gavin explains her unusual behaviors and fears she is losing her mind, though he hasn’t discussed the matter w/ any medical professionals. Scottie is skeptical, BUT agrees after seeing the beautiful Madeleine. 

Stewart would NOT be one you would think of portraying a voyeur and a stalker, yet he pulls it off so well. As one viewer commented (see #TCMParty on Twitter): “Vertigo shows how versatile Jimmy Stewart could really be. That’s the sign of a great actor.” Another movie fan tweeted: “This is where Jimmy’s ‘nice guy’ persona becomes so effective. It’s esp. painful to see him reduced to this.” He enables viewers to sympathize w/ him, even as we cringe at his character’s actions and decisions. 

Hitchcock set his film in San Francisco, a city well known for its unique topography and hilly landscape, in order to add a further torment to Scottie’s life and emphasize the debilitating nature of his vertigo. Location shoots were done at the Big Basin Redwoods State Park and the Spanish mission at San Juan Bautista. Hitch spent a week filming a brief scene where Madeleine stares at a portrait just to get the lighting right. After Judy has been made over into Madeleine, she and Scottie kiss; the actors were on a revolving circular platform (a la Gone with the Wind). 

Vertigo is full of scenes where the colors have been saturated or changed to create a special feeling. Hitchcock even went so far as to openly dye some frames is bright unnatural colors. He played around with colors in all his color films, but never as much as in this one. -Excerpt from IMDB review

Much is done with color and light in this film; you will notice it (even upon first viewing). I noticed more tonight- my second time viewing it fully. An astute viewer noted: “Am noticing for the first time that each scene is pretty monotone – yellow, red, redder, green, blue.” The lighting changes when important events occur. Here are some examples: 1) When Scottie first sees Madeleine in the restaurant, the light around her becomes unnaturally bright. 2) While Scottie is listening to the story of Madeleine’s ancestor in the bookstore, it gets very dark; once he exits, it brightens again. 3) When Scottie first sees Judy made over as Madeleine, she is lit by a ghostly green light (the reflected light from the neon sign outside). On this point, a viewer tweeted: “Bathed in the color green… the ghost of Madeleine is wiping out Judy’s identity.”

There’s a dark sexiness to the film that lends the film an air of mature and serious art. Barbara Bel Geddes’ tragic Midge practically throws herself at Stewart’s Scottie Ferguson, while Novak’s “Madeleine Elster” seems rather matter of fact when she realized that Ferguson had completely undressed her after saving her from death. Later, as Judy Barton, her real identity, she shows a frank knowledge of pickups, sizing Ferguson up as a masher. Judy, it seems, has been around the block once or twice. Where earlier Hitchcock movies played coy with sex, here he tackles the subject head on, and it adds to the film’s mature atmosphere. -The Hitchcock Report blog

The words “power” and “freedom” are repeated three times in the movie: 1) In the beginning, Gavin longs for the old San Francisco b/c there was more power and freedom. 2) At the bookstore, the elderly history buff explains that, in Carlotta Valdes’ time, a man could just throw a woman away b/c he had more power and freedom. 3) During the climax, John suggests that after the murder was completed, Gavin left Judy b/c he had more power and freedom (w/ his wife’s fortune). 

[1] Vertigo is Alfred Hitchcock’s most discussed, dissected and critically reappraised film…

[2] This movie is so deep that you could write a thesis on it and keep adding to it from time to time… Hitchcock really gave his all in this picture… it’s about the ultimate love… wanting to achieve the ultimate love, and, as happens in life, never having love turn out to be the way we want it to be…

[3] If a flaw is to be found, I would say that the script developed for the film was probably not the most friendly for the audience. This film is certainly not for everyone, as it’s slow pace and heavy darkness in the subject may turn off people familiar with Hitchcock’s lighter films as his usual dark humor is not present here…

[4] Hitchcock is in his very best form creating hypnotic scenes and a general sense of unease and dread in even the most banal of situations. A particular favourite of mine is the extended (largely silent) segment where Stewart follows Novak for the first time. Nothing much happens, but the atmosphere of these scenes is enough to keep you on the edge of your seat!

-Excerpts from IMDB reviews

 

 

Rear Window (1954) starring James Stewart & Grace Kelly

This month (July) TCM has been showing Hitchcock’s films every MON & WED; Rear Window is probably my fave of his films. (Strangers on a Train would come in second, b/c WHO could resist the devilish Robert Walker!?) This is a simple story, BUT there is a LOT going on (once you watch it a few times)! Most of you know the synopsis (below from IMDB): 

Professional photographer L.B. “Jeff” Jeffries breaks his leg while getting an action shot at an auto race. Confined to his New York [Chelsea] apartment, he spends his time looking out of the rear window observing the neighbors. He begins to suspect that a man across the courtyard may have murdered his wife. Jeff enlists the help of his high society fashion-consultant girlfriend Lisa Freemont and his visiting nurse Stella to investigate.

When two people love each other, they come together – WHAM – like two taxis on Broadway. -Stella tells Jeff her view of relationships

The relationship between Jeff (James Stewart) and Lisa (Grace Kelly) is a BIT complicated; they are VERY attracted to each other, BUT have different lifestyles and personalities. Jeff thinks that Lisa is TOO good for him; you can tell by the way he describes her (to others and also during their evening dates at home). Lisa is (obviously) waiting for him to settle down (note the comment about the art gallery) and ask for her hand in marriage (b/c she loves him a LOT, putting up w/ his quirks). Straight-talking Stella (Thelma Ritter- always a delight) bemoans the fact that courtships have become SO complicated (LOL- a LOT of modern/single people would agree).

Stewart gets to flex his acting muscles in this darkly comic role. You can’t help but laugh at a LOT of Jeff’s lines, the way he looks, and generally expresses himself. He doesn’t have the luxury of much movement, being confined to a wheelchair (though is still VERY effective). Lisa is willing to make their lives work together, though he has doubts. And when she faces danger, Jeff realizes just how much he loves her! 

[1] Alfred Hitchcock is considered by most to be the master of suspense. I believe he was also a master of understanding human nature. He intuitively understood that human beings are voyeurs by nature, not in the perverted sense, but in the curious sense. 

[2] The acting is superb in this film. Jimmy Stewart is unabashedly obsessed as the lead character. Photographers have an innate visual perceptiveness and the ability to tell a story with an image and Stewart adopts this mindset perfectly. Grace Kelly has often been accused of being the “Ice Maiden” in her films, yet in this film she is assertive and even reckless. Though cool at times, she is often playful and rambunctious. 

[3] The main characters are wonderfully portrayed and full of life. The apparently simple setting in an apartment complex is developed into a world filled with intriguing and sometimes unsettling possibilities, and this apparently average neighborhood comes to life with a wealth of lavish visual detail and interesting minor characters.

-Excerpts from IMDB reviews

 

 

Game of Thrones: Season 7, Episode 2 (“Stormborn”) – Top 10 Lines

SPOILERS: Don’t read this review if you haven’t seen or don’t want to know details from the latest episode of Game of Thrones.

10) That’s not you.

Arya Stark says this to her direwolf Nymeria when they’re reunited (by chance) in the woods. This line takes us back to something she said to her father way back in S1: “That’s not me.” Ned was explaining re: the kind of life a lady would have, BUT young Arya already knew that was NOT the life for her; now, Nymeria has her own life w/ a pack of wolves. Maybe she’ll come out again and help Arya later on?

9) You are my weakness.

This is Grey Worm’s “I love you” to Missandei before their (VERY sweet) love scene.  

8) He’s not a servant.

Yara Greyjoy explains this to Ellaria Sand when they’re drinking below deck re: Theon. She refers to her brother as a “protector,” BUT that turns out to be ironic. Theon’s fears emerge (he is triggered) when he sees brutal uncle, Euron, holding an axe to his sister’s throat; Theon jumps overboard and swims away. He is a survivor or coward- it depends on your thinking. 

7) Just kill us!

Ellaria tells Euron’s soldiers when they capture her and her daughter, Tyene. But we can guess that they are needed alive (for now); they will be presented to Cersei Lannister as a gift- no doubt.

6) No one else will try, so I’m the best you’ve got.

Samwell Tarly solemnly explains to Ser Jorah Mormont before he starts the procedure to remove the greyscale from the knight’s body. This has to be done ASAP, b/c as Archmaester Ebrose said, Jorah will be sent away the next morning (to live out his life w/ The Stone Men in Valyria). The fact that Sam served in the Night’s Watch under Jorah’s father, Lord Cmdr Jeor Mormont, adds to the poignancy of this (hard to watch) scene. I was VERY glad to see Iain Glen again- I hope Jorah gets saved! 

5) Touch my sister, and I’ll kill you myself!

I just LOVED this line (threat) that Jon Snow said to Littlefinger (while choking him)! Jon was visiting Ned’s statue (in the Stark family crypt) when Littlefinger joined him and started running his mouth re: Ned, Catelyn, and his role in defeating Ramsay. I’m glad that Jon is there for Sansa, BUT I think she can probably take care of herself (w/ Brienne at Winterfell). Do you think Jon overreacted? Can Littlefinger still turn Sansa against Jon?

4) While I am away, The North is yours.

Jon shows his trust and confidence in Sansa; she is (pleasantly) surprised. Littlefinger’s smirks- what could that mean? Ser Davos approves of this decision; he will ride w/ Jon to meet w/ Dany.

3) Incompetence should not be rewarded with blind loyalty.

Varys (boldly) says this to Dany after she questions him re: his past life as counsel to her father (Aerys- “The Mad King”), then to Robert Baratheon. Varys, who is truly an up-from-nothing story, doesn’t blindly follow any leader- he wants what is best for the people of Westeros. Dany considers his words, then decides to pardon him, and keep him as her counsel. This is showing her maturity as a leader! (Didn’t this line remind you of Trump? LOL!)

2) The Prince or Princess who was promised will bring the dawn.

Missandei corrects Melisandre’s prophecy, which Dany says she likes. Their is NO mention of gender in ancient Valyrian, so the individual who ends up on the Iron Throne could be male (Jon, Euron, Littlefinger, Varys, etc.) or female (Dany, Cersei, Sansa, etc.) Or, as some fans want, Jon and Dany could rule together! 

1) Be a dragon.

Lady Olenna (Yay, she’s back!) advises Dany with this (VERY cool) line. Only someone of her age, experience, and status in Westeros could get away w/ something like this in front of The Mother of Dragons. Even David and Dan were quite impressed by Diana Rigg’s delivery (as the said after the episode). 

Game of Thrones: Season 7, Episode 1 (“Dragonstone”)

SPOILERS: Don’t read this review if you haven’t seen or don’t want to know details from the season premiere of Game of Thrones.

The Riverlands (House Frey)

Tell them, the North remembers. 

Arya (Maisie Williams), who killed Lord Walder Frey (David Bradley) at the end of S6, impersonates him during a feast in order to murder ALL the Frey men (his heirs) w/ poisoned wine. She leaves his young wife alive, so she can tell the story. 

The North (beyond The Wall somewhere)

Slowly, a HUGE bunch creatures (The Army of the Dead) are marching; they are led by The Night King. Winter IS indeed here, BUT it looks like he has the power to create a storm cloud w/in which they are moving. 

The Wall (Castle Black)

Bran (Isaac Hempstead Wright) and Meera (Ellie Kendrick) arrive at The Wall, where they are questioned by a rather skeptical Edd (Ben Crompton), who is now Lord Commander. Meera introduces herself, then Brandon Stark (his full name, as well as that of great men before him). Bran explains that he knows what Edd has been through, so he and his only companion are let inside. 

The North (Winterfell)

Dragonglass kills White Walkers. It’s more valuable now to us than gold. -Jon explains to a gathering of Northern lords and ladies and Wilding leaders

When Jon (Kit Harington), now King of the North, commands that everyone over the age of 10 (incl. women and girls) will be needed to mine for dragonglass, Lord Glover is a BIT shocked. Lady Lyanna Mormont (Bella Ramsay) quickly stands up and claims that though she is little and a girl, she is “every bit a Northerner” as he is; no wonder this character is a fan fave. She declares that everyone on Bear Island will get to work. 

Give the castles to the families of the men who died fighting for you. -Sansa contradicts Jon when he is deciding on what will be done w/ the Umber and Karstark lands

Some of the leaders agree w/ Sansa (Sophie Turner); they can be heard saying “aye” and making a bit of noise. Did you see Littlefinger’s (Aiden Gillen) little smirk of approval when Sansa did that? Lord Davos (Liam Cunningham) looks a bit concerned; he is sitting to one side of Jon, while Sansa sits on the other. (This scene reminded me of that tense moment in Crimson Tide when Denzel’s character- the executive officer- contradicted Gene Hackman- the captain of a nuclear sub- in front of some of the crew.)

I will not punish a son for his father’s sins. And I will not take a family home away from a family that has held it for centuries. That is my decision, and my decision is final. -Jon says to the leaders

A little boy, Ned Umber, and a teen girl, Alice Karstark, come forward from the group w/ their swords and pledge loyalty to House Stark. Some viewers asked why Alice (a female) could be head of her house, BUT Sansa couldn’t be leading hers. Well, Alice is the only living heir of Lord Karstark, whereas House Stark has BOTH Jon (though a bastard) and Sansa. 

You have to be smarter that father. You need to be smarter than Robb. I loved them. I miss them. But they made stupid mistakes and lost their heads for it. -Sansa explains to Jon 

I LOVE all the convo between Jon and Sansa (on the ramparts of Winterfell)! We learn a bit more re: how Ned treated his daughters vs. his sons. Their personalities and concerns come out also. Sansa wants to be an advisor to Jon, since she can’t be in charge, BUT Jon seems reluctant to hear her. It’s true that Sansa learned a LOT from her time at court as Joffrey’s fiancee. Did you think Sansa became TOO paranoid re: Cersei (after the raven came from King’s Landing w/ her note)? After all, Cersei is thousands of miles away, BUT the White Walkers are getting closer every day (as Jon said). 

King’s Landing

Wow, what a cool map! Cersei (Lena Headey) is having a large and VERY detailed map painted of the Seven Kingdoms. She tells her brother, commander of the Lannister army, that Tyrion has been made Hand of the Queen; he sails w/ Dany, the Dothraki, and the Unsullied to Westeros. Jaime (Nicolas Coster-Waldau) says that Dany will land in Dragonstone (where Stannis used to have his base of operations). Cersei then goes over who the Lannister enemies are one-by-one. We know that Highgarden has the most grain, so will be esp. crucial now that Winter is here. (I can’t wait to see Lady Olenna again! She is the ONLY one left of House Tyrell, sadly.)

I’m the queen of the Seven Kingdoms. -Cersei declares

Three kingdoms at best. I’m not sure you understand how much danger we’re in. -Jaime corrects her

Cersei refuses to talk re: Tommen’s death, even when Jaime brings it up; he looks very sad for a moment. She says that she can’t dwell on the past, the losses she suffered, and that they are “the only Lannisters that matter now.” Jaime points out that they need “better, stronger allies,” esp. now that the Freys are dead. Where will these allies come from? It turns out- the Greyjoys (or at least Euron, the King of the Iron Islands). Well, Jaime is NOT impressed! 

Euron (Danish actor Pilou Asbaek), who has a VERY different haircut and outfit from S6, presents himself to Cersei in the throne room. He is NOT a humble man, as Cersei points out. Euron (at the head of the Iron Fleet) is NOT intimidated by Cersei or Jaime, BUT is stopped from stepping closer to Cersei by Sir Gregor Clegane. Did you see Jaime’s disgust at Euron’s cutting remarks? Quite fabulous! Even though Cersei refuses his marriage proposal, Euron says he’ll bring her “a priceless gift” to win her over. Hmmm… wonder what that could be! Some viewers are saying the head of a dragon; others think it could be Ellaria Sand from Dorne (who planned the murder of Cersei and Jaime’s daughter, Myrcella).    

The Citadel

Everyone doubts everything here- that’s their job. -Archmaester Ebrose explains to Sam (when he says that no one in The Citadel believes him re: the White Walkers).

Poor Sam! We see just how tedious his new life is in a gross/funny/repetitive montage (a first for GoT). He is in training to be a maester, BUT the types of books that he needs (in order to help Jon) are in a locked area. Sam asks Archmaester Ebrose (veteran Australian actor Jim Broadbent) during an autopsy if he could get access. The older/wiser man explains re: the importance of “memory” (history), the role of the maesters, and decides that he does believe Sam’s story. After all, there is evidence of what Sam detailed in various texts; however, he can’t have access to those yet. Sam decides to steal one of the key rings (while the old maesters are sleeping) and check out a few forbidden books. 

Winterfell

In the yard, Brienne of Tarth (Gwendoline Christie) is training her squire, Podrick Payne (Daniel Portman), while Tormund looks on w/ admiration and a goofy grin. Pod keeps getting defeated, BUT the Wildling leader calls him “a lucky man.” Yeah, Tormund still has a big crush on the woman warrior, though it’s NOT mutual!

Even Littlefinger has praise for Brienne’s fighing skills. Sansa wonders what he wants; he says he wants her to be “happy” and “safe.” She explains that here, in her childhood home, she is safe; friends are around and Brienne protects her. Then he asks re: the happy part, and she is quiet. Does anyone think Littlefinger could make Sansa happy!? I LOVED how Sansa dismissed him before he could get the last word! She has become emotionally strong; I don’t think Littlefinger will be able to manipulate her in the future. He is valuable b/c he commands the Lords of the Vale, Sansa explains to Brienne; those were the some of the most skilled knights who helped defeat Ramsay.

The Riverlands (on the path to King’s Landing)

This was a scene that I really liked! I was surprised when I read re: the hate for Ed Sheeran’s cameo and his (maybe too pop-like?) song. Well, it turns out that Maisie Williams is a big fan of this singer, so the GoT showrunners (David Benioff and Dan Weiss) worked to get him to appear on the show, despite his jam-packed schedule. Anyways, let’s try and stick to the scene, NOT the drama that came afterwards.

My mother always told me to be kind to strangers; strangers will be kind to you. -A young Lannister soldier explains to Arya (when she comes upon their camp)

Girls take care of their papas when their papas get old. Boys juts go off and fight in someone else’s wars. -Another soldier, a new father explains why he prefers a girl child (when Arya asks)

At first, I thought this scene would be bloody/violent, BUT it turned out to be quite the opposite. These are young men w/ humble roots (NOT too much older than Arya), who are (obviously) reluctant soldiers. They don’t have much to eat (a small rabbit), BUT share w/ Arya. They also give her a cask of wine to drink from, though she is young. (Some viewer joked re: what was the exact drinking age in Westeros.)

I’m going to kill the queen. -Arya says (before the soldiers burst into laughter)

On the Road

Why are you always in such a foul mood? -Thoros of Myr asks 

Experience. -The Hound (Ser Gregor Clegane) replies 

The Hound (Rory McCann) is still riding w/ The Brotherhood w/o Banners, led by Beric Dondarrion (Richard Dormer). The small band come upon an abandoned farmhouse; instantly, The Hound (as well as observant fans) recognized it as the same place from where he robbed a widower and his young daughter. He doesn’t want to go in (whoa, perhaps feeling some guilt?), BUT Thoros thinks he’s afraid. I LOVE how The Hound made fun of Thoros’ topknot- LOL! 

…there’s nothing special about you. Then why does The Lord of Light keep bringing you back?  -The Hound asks Beric 

It seems like (from what critics/viewers have noted) that we will see a different side to The Hound this season; we will become a more developed/complicated character. So far, we know about his painful past (w/ his brother- Sir Gregor), his empathy w/ troubled females (EX: Sansa), and his view of ALL religions (agnostic; doesn’t like or trust religion). My fave line in of The Hound’s in this ep was re: “divine justice.” I was VERY surprised when he looked into the fire and saw the reason why the Brotherhood was preparing for battle. Probably the biggest surprise was the next scene, where The Hound was digging a grave for the farmer and his daughter in the snowy/windy/cold night.

I’m sorry you’re dead. You deserved better- both of you. -The Hound says this prayer over the grave 

The Citadel

Sam is staying up late, reading, though Gilly says he should sleep. (Wow, look how big Little Sam got! He is a toddler now, even saying a few words.) Sam comes upon a map of Dragonstone w/ a symbol denoting that dragonglass is underneath; Stannis had told him something about it before. Quickly, Sam begins writing a letter to Jon. 

The next day, Sam is collecting food bowls again, BUT in a different location than what we saw before. There could be criminals jailed behind the doors, or maybe patients (as some viewers guessed). As he reaches to retrieve one of the bowls, a hand suddenly reached out to try and grab him- OMG! Sam is freaked out, jumping back. It only takes a second to guess that it’s Ser Jorah Mormont (Iain Glen), though we only hear his voice and see his profile in the dark cell. His entire arm is covered by Grayscale (awww). Jorah asks if The Dragon Queen has come yet.

Dragonstone

This segment of the ep of nearly wordless, yet SO well done! We see Dany (Emilia Clarke) (along w/ her friends and allies) sail ashore, walk across the beach, then enter the fortress (built thousands of years ago by her people, the Targaryens). The dragons fly above, BUT we don’t get close-up of them. Even the verbose Tyrion (Peter Dinklage) is silent as they explore the castle. In the throne room, Dany pauses and looks at the throne, BUT decides NOT to sit upon it. Instead, she goes to the map/war room (which was where Stannis plotted his military strategies). This is the room MOST familiar to fans; we hadn’t seen ALL the other cool details of Dragonstore before. Some Jewish viewers noted that they esp. liked the part where Dany touched the sand on the beach; it reminded them of how Jews (from all over the world) sometimes touch the earth of their ancestral homeland upon coming to visit Israel.