Movies, Theater… & More Around DC (NOV/DEC)

FRI, NOV 10 & weekends (NOV 11-12 & 18-19)

FotoWeek DC 2017

Whether through fine art photography, photojournalism, or the work of emerging artists, FotoDC provides a dynamic, evocative, engaging experience for photographers, cultural institutions, galleries, curators, schools, area residents, and tens of thousands of viewers.  

I MAY have heard of this event before, BUT have never gone! You can also volunteer during this event; I sent in an application (via Google doc). 

http://www.fotodc.org/events-fotoweekdc-2017

FRI, NOV 10 (5:30-8:30PM), National Press Club

2017 Book Fair & Authors’ Night

Authors will talk to fans and sign books at this literary event (now in its 40th yr). Tickets are $5 for NPC and Politics & Prose members; $10 for the public. Tickets will also be sold online and at the door.

http://www.press.org/bookfair

WED, NOV 15 (7PM), Smithsonian Natl Museum of Natural History (Baird Auditorium)

The Problem with Apu (w/ Hari Kondabolu)

In the new documentary, Kondabolu confronts his long-standing nemesis Apu Nahasapeemapetilon—better known as the Indian convenience store owner on The Simpsons.

Creator and star Kondabolu discusses how this controversial caricature came about, burrowed its way into the hearts and minds of Americans, and continues to exist—intact—nearly three decades later. The film features interviews with Aziz Ansari, Kal Penn, Whoopi, W. Kamau Bell, Aasif Mandvi, Hasan Minhaj, Utkarsh Ambudkar, and Aparna Nancherla, as well as Simpsons writer Dana Gould and others. -Synopsis from Smithsonian web site

This is FREE y’all, so you just need to RSVP (after setting up a free Smithsonian account)! After the screening, Hari will be having a discussion w/ Elizabeth Blair (NPR). If you know me, you know I’m a BIG fan of his- YAY!

FYI: This doc will also be shown on SUN, NOV 19th on truTV.

https://smithsonianassociates.org/ticketing/Tickets/Reserve.aspx?id=240875

THURS, NOV 16 (7:15PM), AFI Silver

Big in Bollywood (w/ intro & Q&A w/ actor Omi Vaidya)

California-born, NYU-educated Omi Vaidya had been struggling to make it in Hollywood as an Indian-American actor when he was suddenly offered a role in Mumbai. The film was 3 IDIOTS, and when it turned out to be an overwhelming critical and box office success, Omi — who hardly spoke any Hindi — woke up to overnight stardom in India. His unlikely story is told in this creative documentary, made by Vaidya’s college friends: just like 3 IDIOTS, this is a film about camaraderie and success, but told from behind the scenes. -Synopsis from AFI web site

You gotta LOVE living in/near downtown Silver Spring (DTSS), esp. when you hear about events like this! I’m inviting ALL my local gal pals to come out; hopefully, some of them can make it. I also think this will make a V interesting (future) blog post.

FYI: Vaidya is one of the ensemble cast of Brown Nation (Netflix).

https://silver.afi.com/Browsing/Movies/Details/m-0100001643

WED, NOV 29 (7:30PM) & SAT, DEC 2 (2PM): Round House Theatre (Bethesda)

The Book of Will (Pay-What-You-Can)

What if Shakespeare’s works had been lost forever? After the death of their friend and mentor, two actors are determined to compile the First Folio and preserve the words that shaped their lives. They’ll just have to borrow, beg, and band together to get it done. 

I used to work a block away from this theater, so I usually noticed what was going on (thanks to posters hanging outside and convos of some Bethesda residents). My parents BOTH liked Miss Bennett last holiday season, which was also written by Lauren Gunderson. PWYC events are great, as long as you plan ahead (b/c you need to wait in line) and bring some cash ($15 is suggested donation, but you can give whatever amount fits your budget). Don’t be embarrassed if you’re (temporarily) broke! I usually take along a friend or my parents (if it’s a weekend).

http://www.roundhousetheatre.org/performances/book-of-will

SAT, DEC 9 & SUN, DEC 10: Walter E. White Convention Center

MetroCooking DC 2017

Shop. Sip. Sample! Spend the day experiencing the many culinary highlights of MetroCooking DC. Restock your pantry and shop for holiday gifts at our exhibitor marketplace, featuring select vendors selling and sampling specialty foods, confections, utensils, appliances, and many other unique kitchen wares. Enjoy watching your favorite celebrity chef whip up delicious dishes live on the James Beard Foundation Cooking Stage. Learn useful tips, tricks, and trends geared toward cooking, home entertaining and healthy living at the Taste Talks Workshops. Plus, give the gift of cooking this season and pick up an autographed cookbook in our bookstore. Grab your friends for a fun, food filled day out! 

I saw an ad for this event (NEVER been before) on the metro this evening… and got V excited. Sure, I LOVE movies, the theater, BUT my love of food is above ALL that! This year, celeb chefs- Guy Fieri and Jose Andres (whose restaurants are FAB)- will be appearing. General Admission for either day (10AM-5PM) is $21.50; there is also a Groupon deal ($14) that you can buy. 

http://www.metrocookingdc.com

https://www.groupon.com/deals/gl-metro-cooking-dc-7

 

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MUST-SEE for ANY Shakespeare Fan: A Presentation by Author/Actor Ben Crystal

Breakdown of segments in this video:

0:00-5:00 – Introduction & Ben’s own challenges with studying, then performing, Shakespeare. 

5:00-10:00 – What exactly is iambic pentameter? (Ben shows us how it’s part of everyday life!) Discussion of sonnet form, poetry, and prose.

10:00-39:00 – Ben breaks down, in a fresh new way, 3 famous scenes from Romeo & Juliet, Macbeth, Hamlet, and King Lear (w/ the help of two actors from his theater company and his linguist father). Ben speaks in Shakespeare’re original pronunciation (OP)- it’s a mix of different accents from Elizabethan England (“a melting pot”). 

39:00- 58:00 – Ben talks about how Shakespeare “directs the actors” w/ his writing, his own eclectic accent, then reveals to us the original pronunciation (OP) from the Bard’s day- a mix of different accents from Elizabethan England (“a melting pot”). Ben looks at the (bawdy) humor in a scene from As You Like It and the almost-military cadence to one of the monologues in Richard III.

58:00 – 1:02:00 – Suggestions of how to teach Shakespeare in schools (incl. to young children).

1:03:00 – end – Q&A w/ the audience (as well as others watching ALL over the world).

My Fair Lady (1964) starring Audrey Hepburn & Rex Harrison

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Flower seller Eliza Doolittle (Audrey Hepburn) dreams of a better life.

[1] From first frame to last, the film is slick, graceful, gorgeous to behold, with costumes and sets richly evoking the Edwardian era…

[2] The acting from Rex Harrison deserves high praise, it is effortless and believable. The same can be said for Audrey Hepburn… 

…despite his success, the experience of tutoring Eliza has humbled him. The end of the film where they show respect and care for each other was a masterstroke as no romance was needed.

[3] What Higgins is, in reality, is a misanthrope. A misanthrope basically dislikes and distrusts everyone! Watch the film and you’ll notice that Higgins treats everyone with the same disregard…

[4] The songs are extraordinary in their ability to enrich our knowledge of the characters… Eliza’s father, who calls himself one of “the undeserving poor” is one of Shaw’s best comedy creations… 

[5] It’s a momentous film but it has its subtle points: watch the way in which Eliza’s eyes are centered on Higgins when she enters at the ball, and the way in which the two of them stare at each other for a few seconds at the top of the stairs a few moments later.

-Excerpts from various IMDB reviews 

This is a musical that I’ve seen MANY times (usually w/ my family as a kid); I esp. like the songs and costumes. This is one of my mom’s fave films; she’s a big Audrey Hepburn fan. The play Pygmalion by George Bernard Shaw was inspired by a Greek myth by Ovid. Pygmalion was a sculptor from Cyprus who carved a woman out of ivory. This statue was so beautiful and realistic, he fell in love with it. When Aphrodite’s festival day came, Pygmalion made offerings at the altar of the goddess of love, and wished for a bride who would look like his statue. When he returned home, Pygmalion kissed the statue, and found that its lips felt warm. He kissed it again, and found that it was transformed into a real woman. Aphrodite had granted Pygmalion’s wish. He married the woman (named Galatea) w/ Aphrodite’s blessing. 

You see this creature with her curbstone English? The English that will keep her in the gutter till the end of her days? Well, sir, in six months, I could pass her off as a duchess at an Embassy Ball. I could even get her a job as a lady’s maid or a shop assistant, which requires better English. -Professor Henry Higgins declares to Colonel Pickering 

Eliza Doolittle (Hepburn) is no marble Galatea lacking agency; she is a single working-class woman in early 1900s London who has a job (selling flowers), rents her own room, and lives a morally upright life (she insists: “I’m a good girl, I am!”) She dreams of having comfort and love, as we hear in the song Wouldn’t it Be Loverly?  Some lyrics below:

All I want is a room somewhere
Far away from the cold night air
With one enormous chair
Oh, wouldn’t it be loverly?

Someone’s head restin’ on my knee
Warm and tender as he can be
Who takes good care of me
Oh, wouldn’t it be loverly?

Even in this early scene, it is Eliza’s will that drives the plot; Higgins might have tinkered forever with his phonetic alphabet and his recording devices if Eliza hadn’t insisted on action… It is her ambition, not Henry’s, that sets the plot in motion…

Eliza’s escape from the “lower classes,” engineered by Higgins, is a revolutionary act… It is a lesson that resonates for all societies, and the genius of “My Fair Lady” is that it is both a great entertainment and a great polemic. It was actually about something. 

-Roger Ebert

After meeting Professor Henry Higgins (Rex Harrison), Eliza wants lessons to get rid of her (Cockney) accent. She wants a better job working in a florist’s shop. Eliza even offers to pay, BUT the elderly/kind Col. Pickering (Wilfrid Hyde-White) insists on providing the funds (even getting her new clothes). Higgins only thinks of Eliza as a challenging project, NOT an individual w/ feelings and dreams.

my_fair_lady_racing.jpg
Eliza enters high society by attending a horse race with Higgins.

Over 6 months, Eliza works w/ Higgins (and Pickering, serving as a cheerleader) to improve her pronunciation, vocabulary, and manners. At the races, she looks gorgeous in her fitted white and black gown, and catches the eye of Freddy Eynsford-Hill (Jeremy Brett). Eliza makes polite small talk w/ some society people, BUT then launches into a funny/inappropriate story from her old life. We see that though Eliza can pronounce the words, she hasn’t yet learned which words to choose to speak in high society. However, the young/handsome Freddy gets a huge crush on Eliza, as we hear in On the Street Where You Live:

Does enchantment pour
Out of every door?
No, it’s just on the street where you live
And oh, the towering feeling
Just to know somehow you are near
The overpowering feeling
That any second you may suddenly appear

Higgins (who Eliza gets to know by living in his house) doesn’t praise the hard work Eliza has done or see how naturally pretty she was (underneath the soot and rags). On the other hand, Freddy (a mere acquaintance) is VERY happy to bring her flowers and get a glimpse of her face. It makes more sense that Eliza would end up w/ Freddy, NOT Higgins. 

At the ball, Eliza is stunning (hair, jewels, gown, her dancing, etc.)- even fooling Zoltan Karpathy, the blackmailing language expert (and former student of Higgins). However, she is dismayed/saddened when Higgins gets ALL the credit (You Did It). Eliza becomes sophisticated, transcending the parameters of the professor’s test of social engineering. She resents this, so she throws slippers at Higgins. Eliza sees that he has his own social and emotional limitations. 

Higgins seems unaware of the place of women; in his mind, Eliza’s worries are over. Eliza asks him what she is to do with herself, now that she has become a lady. He says that she could marry.  Eliza’s answer shows that lower-class women MAY have a stronger sense of morality than most “ladies.” She never before thought of selling herself into marriage.

I sold flowers. I didn’t sell myself. Now you’ve made a lady of me, I’m not fit to sell anything else. -Eliza explains to Higgins 

Eliza goes off to Mrs. Higgins’ house for advice. Sure, we know Freddy wants to marry her, but she’s NOT sure that’s the right step. (Notice how she tosses, then later retrieves, the ring that Higgins gave her?) The relationship between Mrs. Higgins (Gladys Cooper) and her son is humorous b/c the mother’s attitude toward her son is eccentric; she expresses herself w/ as much honesty as her son. Mrs. Higgins is filled with tolerance, intelligence, and imagination. Like Higgins’ housekeeper, Mrs. Pearce, she was VERY concerned over the fate of Eliza from early on in the story.

Eliza’s hard work resulted in her developing an intense devotion and loyalty towards Higgins (and also Pickering). Maybe she’s NOT feeling a romantic kind love, BUT a strong desire to please? When the film ends, the audience is left to ponder what will happen to the characters later.  Now, for my younger sister, it was a foregone conclusion that Higgins and Eliza would marry. I was NOT 100% sure though; it’s an ambiguous ending. 

When Eliza emancipates herself – when Galatea comes to life – she must not relapse. She must retain her pride and triumph to the end. When Higgins takes your arm on ‘consort battleship’ you must instantly throw him off with implacable pride; and this is the note until the final ‘Buy them yourself.’ He will go out on the balcony to watch your departure; come back triumphantly into the room; exclaim ‘Galatea!’ (meaning that the statue has come to life at last); and – curtain. Thus he gets the last word; and you get it too. -George Bernard Shaw in a 1920 letter to actress playing Eliza (Mrs. Patrick Campbell) 

Shaw asserted that such a wedding is absolutely impossible. He subtitled his play a “romance” b/c the technical meaning of “romance” refers to anything that was highly improbable (EX: the transformation of a flower girl into a duchess in six months). A romance can also suggest a “happy ending,” and Shaw is not interested in that. He wouldn’t allow his creation, Eliza, to marry such a misfit as Higgins simply to satisfy the whims of the sentimentalists of the world, even though these people outnumber the realists. But we know Broadway, then later Hollywood, had other ideas!