Suburban Life Can Be Murder: “Crime of Passion” (1956) starring Barbara Stanwyck, Sterling Hayden, & Raymond Burr

A successful advice columnist at The San Francisco Post, Kathy Ferguson (Barbara Stanwyck- 50 and looking fab), is an independent woman w/ no intention of ever getting married. She meets LAPD detective, Lt. Bill Doyle (Sterling Hayden- age 40), during the investigation of a prominent case (which is resolved w/ her help). Sparks fly, they fall in love, and decide to get married (too fast). Kathy quits her job and moves to LA to be a housewife.

Bill is close to his colleagues and their wives; they have regular dinner parties at his home. The banal conversations of these women are almost unbearable for Kathy, who has worked mainly around men and (perhaps) prefers their company. The cops’ wives seem frivolous; she’d feel more comfortable playing cards w/ the men rather than trading recipes with the women. The lack of ambition on Bill’s part push Kathy to a scheme to improve his prospects in the police dept. Kathy “accidentally” has a fender bender on the street where Inspector Anthony Pope (Raymond Burr- also 40 and slimmed down) and his wife Alice (Fay Wray of King Kong fame) live. Social climbing, scheming, and more ensue!

Some women should just not get married; nowadays, there are other routes to follow. This unique movie combines elements of film noir and domestic melodrama. Some viewers have called it “proto-feminist” and “ahead of its time.” I thought that writing was intelligent and also witty at times; the screenplay was by a woman- Jo Eisinger. This is the last film noir for both Stanwyck and Burr; they’d transition to working primarily in TV and appearing only occasionally in movies. Burr moved from the “heavy” (shady/villainous) types he played in films to heroic defense attorney in Perry Mason.

[1] …turns out to be a fairly interesting, sexually frank, compact little noir, featuring a once-in-a-lifetime cast. Stanwyck… is as intense as ever (she always gave her all in every picture); Hayden is his typically macho, upright self; Raymond Burr, playing Hayden’s boss, is a tad less sleazy than usual but still not to be trusted…

[2] Sharper socially than even Fritz Lang’s late noirs, “Crime of Passion” reminds us of the “nostalgia” for the “happy family values” of the 1950’s for the wishful (?) thinking that it is. Stanwyck’s slow descent into middle-class torpor and madness (she’s a sharp, witty, intelligent woman who saddles herself with a maddeningly boring and conventional cop husband, played nicely against type by Sterling Hayden) lays bare the social nightmare presented to women desiring anything but the conventional patriarchal lifestyle…

-Excerpts from IMDB reviews

“Star Trek: TNG” (Season 1) – Top 5 Episodes

Introduction

S1 of the American sci-fi TV series Star Trek: The Next Generation (TNG) started airing in broadcast syndication in the US on September 28, 1987, and concluded on May 16, 1988 (after 26 episodes were broadcast). Set in the 24th c. the series follows the adventures of the crew of the Starfleet starship Enterprise-D. It was the first live-action TV series in the franchise to be broadcast since Star Trek: The Original Series (TOS) was cancelled in 1969; it was also the first to feature all new characters. Paramount Television eventually sought the advice of the creator of Star Trek, Gene Roddenberry, who set about creating the new show w/ mostly former TOS staff members. An entirely new cast were sought, which concerned some members of TOS crew, as Roddenberry did not want to re-tread the same steps as he had in the first series. Aliens such as Vulcans, Klingons and Romulans were banned at first.

The characters in the series gradually changed during preproduction, with adjustments made to the names, genders and ethnicity. When the cast was announced at first, LeVar Burton was the main actor highlighted because of his work on the Roots miniseries; his character, Geordi La Forge was named for a disabled fan. Although the casting was managed by producers Rick Berman and Robert H. Justman, Roddenberry intervened to switch the characters assigned to Marina Sirtis and Denise Crosby. Sirtis took over Crosby’s role as Deanna Troi, and Crosby became Tasha Yar (previously named Macha Hernandez). Michael Dorn (who came from a musical theater background) played Lt. Cmdr. Worf- the first Klingon in Starfleet. Worf would go on to be developed more in Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, as would transporter chief Miles O’Brien (Colm Meaney).

Behind the scenes, the writing team became chaotic; Roddenberry’s insistence on re-writing scripts and other behavior alienated some staff. Longtime contributor D.C. Fontana quit, filing a claim with the Writer’s Guild of America (WGA) as she had been acting as story editor (but was unpaid in the role). The series had a problem recruiting potential writers; by the end of S2, all the writing staff recruited during S1 (except for Rick Berman) had quit. While highly anticipated, initial reviews other than for “Encounter at Farpoint” were poor. The second episode, “The Naked Now” had fans and critics concerned that TNG would re-hash plots of The Original Series; “Code of Honor” was seen as racist.

Episode 1: Encounter at Farpoint

They bloody hated us. -Marina Sirtis recalled (in 2002, while doing publicity for Star Trek: Nemesis) re: critical reception to TNG debut

Capt. Jean-Luc Picard (Patrick Stewart) assumes command of the Federation’s flagship (the U.S.S. Enterprise), and its new crew w/ both humans and non-humans races. On the way to Farpoint space station on the Bandi planet, they come under the control of Q (John de Lancie), an alien from a superior civilization. Q calls humanity backward savages and puts the crew to a test. The Bandi leader, Zorn, offers use of the facilities, but no answers to how the station was built and what are the troubling feelings Counselor Deanna Troi (Marina Sirtis) is picking up.

I think the Q thing did come out of a time requirement, but there isn’t any question in my mind that the best thing in the show is that Q story. If it had been only that other story, it would have been a disappointment. The other thing that comes out of ‘Farpoint’ is a vision of Roddenberry’s where we have Picard arguing for the future of mankind, representing the advocate of humanity to this Q who puts humanity on trial. That’s an extraordinary, philosophically ambitious idea, and it really helps to define why Star Trek is what it is. Without that, it would have been spaceships and monsters and special effects. -Michael Piller

Jonathan Frakes wasn’t the first choice for Riker; Rodenberry preferred Billy Campbell (see S2, E4: The Outrageous Okana). The producers liked Frakes better; Christopher MacDonald (see S3 E15: Yesterday’s Enterprise) and Jeffrey Combs (who became a frequent ST character actor) also auditioned for Riker. The intro scene of Riker and Counselor Troi (Marina Sirtis), as well as subsequent follow-up dialogue, was almost identical to that of Decker and Ilia in Star Trek: The Motion Picture. In the second half of this ep, after Riker thanks a female ensign for helping him locate Lt. Cmdr. Data (Brent Spiner) and walks away from the computer panel, she does a (very obvious) downward glance at his butt (checking him out).

DeForest Kelley’s cameo (the actor’s final role) as Admiral McCoy was a late addition to the script devised by Roddenberry. Producer Robert Justman (who also worked on TOS) noted that Kelley was honored and refused more than SAG scale salary. This ep is the first mention of the “Ferengi Alliance” who are hinted at being an enemy of the Federation; they were intended to be the new villains (b/c peace had been made w/ Klingons). This idea was eventually abandoned after the Ferengi made their appearance and weren’t taken seriously (by actors and writers). This marks the first time that a saucer separation is seen onscreen; the reason why it was so rare to see the Enterprise-D separate is b/c writers found out it slowed the story down. At one point, Picard gives an order for Worf to raises shields. A “shield raising” sound effect is heard for the only time in the series. Also, Picard orders “print outs,” which are never seen onscreen or mentioned again.

The teleplay was written by Fontana and Rodenberry (“he added all the Q stuff,” Fontana explained). Fontana’s first story “Meeting at Farpoint” had several different storylines and names. The Enterprise-D had just completed a successful mission. The captain was named Julien Picard, the first officer was Kyle Summers, and security chief was Macha Hernandez. Summers was promoted to captain and was up to take command of the science vessel (Starseeker) at Farpoint Station. While in orbit of the station, crew transfers included Lt. Cmdr. William Riker, Lt. Cmdr. Data, Dr. Beverly Crusher and her 15 y.o. old daughter Leslie. Riker and Data share a deep friendship. An alien vessel appeared and sent a message that all personnel had to beam to the planet or die. The captain of the Starseeker fires photon torpedoes at the vessel resulting in the destruction of his ship. At Picard’s orders, the crew of the Enterprise-D beamed to the surface and made contact to their enemy, the Annoi, an ape-like species w/ superior technology. The Annoi made the crew and the inhabitants of Farpoint their slaves to mine a mineral- Balmin. An away team incl. Data, Riker, Troi and Hernandez get aboard the Annoi ship w/ the help of Leslie Crusher’s knowledge about the ship’s layout. Troi then learned that there is no engineering room aboard, as the ship is a lifeform. This lifeform was enslaved by the Annoi and needs Balmin to survive.

Episode 5: Where No One Has Gone Before

Lt. Commander Data: Captain, we’re here. Why not avail ourselves of this opportunity for study? There is a giant protostar here in the process of forming. No other vessel has been out this far.

Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Spoken like a true Starfleet graduate.

Riker considers Federation scientist Kosinski’s (Stanley Kamel) project to boost the ship’s propulsion absurd, Picard obeys the Admiralty’s orders. Kosinski never wears a communicator, even though he is in a Starfleet uniform. This is unusual, but many details indicate that Kosinski is a civilian (the insignia, being called an “expert” or “Mr.” Fascinated by this process, Wesley sits w/ his alien assistant (Eric Menyuk) and they become friendly. The results jump the ship into a galaxy millions of light year away! Deciding against immediate study, Picard orders Kosinski to get them back. Only Wesley notices that his assistant, who “fades” supernaturally, is the real key. The next jump brings them to a place everyone’s hopes or fears come to reality. The alien assistant grows weak and and reveals his “Traveler” identity. Wesley is rewarded w/ the role of acting ensign; he can come on the bridge and will study for the Starfleet Academy entrance exam. This ep is considered by many to be the original premise behind the series Star Trek: Voyager.

Riker: Then why, in all of our history, is there no record of you or someone like you ever having visited us?

The Traveler: What wonderful arrogance! There is no record because we have not visited you before.

Riker: Why not?

The Traveler: Well, because, up until now – if-if you’ll forgive this – you’ve been… uninteresting.

Justman said that hiring 27-year-old Rob Bowman to direct was one of his proudest achievements on the show. Bowman went on to direct 12 more eps of the series. Bowman remembers: “It was a very enlightening script, the likes of which you don’t very often see on television. I felt very fortunate that it was such a great script, but, personally, I was terrified because it was my first episode and I wanted to make a good impression. I worked on that show every day I had the script, which, including the shooting, was like 20 days for me.”

While shooting the scene in this episode where Riker tells Picard “It wasn’t him, it never was. It was his assistant”, Frakes had some difficulty saying the line and eventually could not say it w/o breaking into a laugh. According to Stewart, the event soon spread “like a bushfire” on the set; even the sound mixer (Alan Bernard) had to wheel his sound cart off the set as he also couldn’t stop laughing.

This is a personal highlight from a season with little to have a song and dance about. […] It’s a superb episode which shows the strength of the main cast as well as displaying some great guest performances…

This episode marks the first glimmer of what this series would become and why I love it: a great mix of fantastic storytelling, science fiction and philosophy.

-Excerpts from IMBD reviews

Episode 12: Datalore

Picard: You’ll feel uncomfortable about aspects of your duplicate, Data. We feel uncomfortable too, and for no logical reason. If it feels awkward to be reminded that Data is a machine, just remember that *we* are merely a different variety of machine – in our case, electrochemical in nature.

The Enterprise visits Data’s planet (Omicron Theta) to learn more about his somewhat mysterious beginnings. The small population of the planet died of unknown reasons 20+ yrs back; Data was found around that time. The away team find an underground complex and a disassembled version of Data! They rebuild and activate him; this is Lore, a supposedly earlier/ superior version of Data. Lore is a word which means “The body of knowledge”. He claims he was disassembled b/c he was so human-like that he frightened the local population. Lore even has the ability to call upon a crystalline entity w/ great destructive power (which destroyed the planet and killed its inhabitants).

Lore: Dr. Soong made me perfect in his first attempt. But he made me so completely human, the colonists became envious of me.

Data: You lived with the colonists?

Lore: [nods] Until they petitioned Soong to make a more comfortable, less perfect android. In other words, you, Brother.

This was the final ep written by Roddenberry before his death on October 24, 1991. Spiner suggested that Lore be made Data’s “Evil Twin.” Initially, Lore was to be neither evil nor a lookalike of Data; Lore was first created as a female and a potential love interest for Data. Bowman credited Spiner for making the ep work, giving one example, “He did the one scene in his own office with Brent sitting down and Lore discussing what it’s like to be human. He did one side, we shot through a double, then turned around, read it the other way and shot the other half of it. Those two characters in those scenes are different people… he really painted those characters differently.” The line “Shut up Wesley!” spoken by both Dr. Crusher and Picard has become a popular catchphrase for fans to express frustration w/ Wesley (LOL).

Episode 25: Conspiracy

Picard: [after meeting with Keel about a possible Starfleet conspiracy] Friends, close friends, few and far between. Two of the oldest and closest were Jack Crusher, may he rest in peace and Walker Keel. Before various missions split us up we were virtually inseparable. I trust Keel completely. If he felt it necessary to violate regulations he must have had a very good reason.

Troi: But you’re putting your career at risk for him.

Picard: Friendship must dare to risk, Counsellor. Or it’s not friendship.

Capt. Walker Keel, an old friend of Picard’s, uses a top-secret frequency, to summon him to a top-secret meeting w/ two other captains. There is vague innuendo about a plot to take over the Federation by replacing Starfleet officers; this doesn’t impress Picard, but he reconsiders after Keel and his crew die in an explosion. Picard decides to visit Starfleet HQ w/ where he’ll be dine w/ some admirals. Riker will keep an eye on Admiral Aaron (who insists on visiting the ship) and is carrying an alien brain-parasite in a briefcase!

Roddenberry originated the idea for the ep in a single-sentence proposal entitled “The Assassins”. Robert Sabaroff expanded this idea to 30 pages, but his version was seen as too expensive. Tracy Tormé was then given the job of rewriting it, but some producers thought the new version was too dark (until Roddenberry read and endorsed it). Wired magazine has suggested that the premise was based on the Iran–Contra affair. In 2019, The Hollywood Reporter listed this ep among the 25 best eps of TNG. In 2020, GameSpot noted this episode as one of the most bizarre moments of series, the startlingly graphic explosion and melting of a parasitic alien and host.

Episode 26: The Neutral Zone

Data: They are the most unusual humans I have ever encountered.

Riker: Well, from what I’ve seen of our guests, there’s not much to redeem them. Makes one wonder how our species survived the 21st century.

While Picard is away at an emergency Federation conference, the crew discovers an ancient space capsule from Earth. Inside they find three humans in cryogenic chambers. Data asks to move the chambers to the Enterprise and Riker agrees. Picard returns and orders the ship to the Neutral Zone, as several Federation outposts near the edges of the zone have not responded to communications. He explains that the conference was about the potential threat of the Romulans, who haven’t been seen for decades. As Data and Dr. Crusher work to thaw the cryonically preserved humans, Picard admonishes Data for bringing them aboard during a crucial time. Picard and puts Riker in charge of looking after them.

Data: [on the Human female] Her name is Clare Raymond. Age: 35. Occupation: homemaker. Must be some kind of construction work.

The survivors—Claire Raymond (Gracie Harrison), a housewife; Ralph Offenhouse (Peter Mark Richman), a financier; and L. Q. “Sonny” Clemmons (Leon Rippy), a musician—are from the late 20th c. They all died of incurable illnesses and were placed in cryonic suspension after their deaths in the hope that cures might be found in the future. Dr. Crusher easily cures them of their illnesses. They have to cope w/ the culture shock of awakening in a distant future with the realization that everything they knew and had are now gone. Clemmons seems to fare the best and befriends Data. Claire is distraught at the thought of losing her children, so Troi suggests searching for her descendants. Offenhouse is irritated by the lack of access to news or other information; he uses the comm unit to disturb Picard on the bridge. Picard assures everyone that all questions will be answered, but that the ship’s mission requires his full attention.

Picard: This is the 24th century. Material needs no longer exist.

Ralph Offenhouse: Then what’s the challenge?

Picard: The challenge, Mr. Offenhouse, is to improve yourself. To enrich yourself. Enjoy it.

The Enterprise reaches the Neutral Zone and confirms that the outposts have been destroyed. They are soon met by a Romulan Warbird; Cmdr. Tebok (Marc Alaimo) questions why the Enterprise has approached the zone. As Picard tries to explain his actions, Offenhouse arrives on the bridge and threatens to disrupt the tense situation, though he correctly guesses that the Romulans are also seeking answers. Picard and the Romulans agree to pool their resources to discover the culprit. Picard later comments that while the encounter went favorably, the Romulans may be a significant threat in future engagements. Picard arranges to transport the 20th-century humans to Earth.

Commander Tebok: Your presence is not wanted. Do you understand my meaning, Captain? We… are back!

[The Warbird departs]

Picard: I think our lives just became a lot more complicated.

This ep introduced the redesigned Romulans, w/ prosthetic forehead pieces (designed by makeup supervisor Michael Westmore). This also the the first appearance of the Romulan Warbird (created by designer Andrew Probert). Due to the impending WGA strike, writer/co-EP Maurice Hurley developed the teleplay in a day and a half from fan fiction by Deborah McIntyre and Mona Clee. Due to the WGA strike, certain story ideas were removed from the plot incl. the first appearance of the Borg, which was delayed until the S2 ep “Q Who.” “The Neutral Zone” was originally intended to be the first of a 2-part episode, but due to the strike there wasn’t enough time to write the second part and so the story was shortened.

In the writers and directors’ guide for the series, written by Roddenberry prior to the first season, Romulans were covered by one of the main writing rules: “No stories about warfare with Klingons and Romulans and no stories with Vulcans. We are determined not to copy ourselves and believe there must be other interesting aliens in a galaxy filled with billions of stars and planets.” Following the failure of the Ferengi as the main villains of TNG by the producers, the Romulans became the main villains during the early years of the series (besides the Borg).

“Star Trek: Voyager” (Season 5)

Introduction

In the Summer of 1998, writer/producer Brannon Braga voiced the writing staff’s intention to “push the envelope” of alien encounters in S5. Braga was also exerting more control over the show, but Rick Berman (who didn’t start as a writer- his background was as a studio exec) held more power. Berman would be pulling the reins back (as many long-time ST fans noted) when stories didn’t gel w/ his vision. Braga and (frequent writing partner) Joe Menosky were trying to take risks; they’re good at character development (but maybe not big on continuity). Menosky wrote the teleplays for 7 eps of TNG: The Chase, Darmok, Time’s Arrow (Pts. I & II), The Nth Degree, First Contact, and Clues. There are unique eps in this season, incl. E12: Bride of Chaotica! (shot in B&W), which is part of Lt. Tom Paris’ Captain Proton holodeck program. Later in the season, there is E23: 11:59 (a twist on a holiday story) set in 2000. I think S5 is worth seeing.

Season 5: Selected Episodes

Episode 1: Night

There are no stars, no planets, no light- just the ship out alone for 2 mos. w/ no expectations for encountering another star system for another 2 yrs. “Every sailor’s worst nightmare,” Chakotay (Robert Beltran) comments ominously. Monotony hits the crew hard until a an alien race (that lives in darkness) attacks, mistaking Voyager as an ally of a poisonous garbage freighter run by another race (the Malon). The teleplay was written by Braga and Menosky. The director was David Livingston; he uses some (new to the series) shots, which made the show seem fresh.

The psychological aspects of the ep are quite interesting. An early shot of the ship is eerie, w/ no stars visible anywhere, and the only light coming from Voyager itself. Chakotay’s on the bridge, but we don’t see Capt. Janeway (Kate Mulgrew). The staff meeting is also run by Chakotay (not Janeway). When senior officers ask about her, Chakotay responds: “The captain sends her regards.” The captain is holed up in her quarters, racked w/ guilt. Chakotay says: “You’ve picked a bad time to isolate yourself from the crew.” Janeway has always been one who maintains confidence in the decisions she makes. Some fans/critics thought that shutting herself away was implausible (and out of character).

This is a good ensemble ep, as all of the main cast get something to do. Lt. Tom Paris (Robert Duncan McNeil) and Lt. B’Elanna Torres (Roxann Dawson) fight over the smallest matters. Neelix (Ethan Phillips) gets severe panic attacks. Tuvok (Tim Russ) goes to meditate in Astrometrics, which surprised Seven of Nine (Jeri Ryan). He even makes a pun (haha), saying “the view from my window has been less than stellar lately.” Ensign Harry Kim (Garrett Wang) composes a morose song on his clarinet- Echoes of the Void. Chakotay is holding things together, but even he looks tense and worried.

…there’s also the new “Captain Proton” holonovel- Paris’ fantasy program that pays homage to those cheap 1940s sci-fi serials. It’s a scream. (Besides, how can you not like a holodeck program that’s offered in black-and-white?)

…manages both to entertain and to frustrate. The teaser and first act are wonderfully engaging, but then the show slowly descends into reasonable action and ultimately resigns itself to shallow solutions, which is a shame. Within this episode I see elements that could turn out to be the beginnings of some very good trends, but I also see some of the same old pratfalls and the series’ general refusal to tell a story requiring any length of an attention span.

-Excerpt from Jammer’s Reviews

Episode 2: Drone

[Torres is concerned with the drone’s development]

Neelix: It will become what we help it to become.

B’Elanna: [mocking] Mm! How Starfleet of you!

Voyager investigates the birth of a nebula. Unfortunately, its intense blast wave catches an away mission shuttle, causing emergency beam-out transporter signals to fuse The Doctor’s mobile emitter w/ Seven’s nanoprobes. The mobile emitter later starts assimilating a science lab and extracts DNA from Ensign Mulcahy to create a new Borg drone built upon the emitter’s 29th c. technology! This teleplay was written by Bryan Fuller (who became a writer so he could work on a ST show), Braga, and Menosky. This ep will remind you of TNG: S5, E23 (I Borg), which was written by Rene Echevarria. As young writers, Braga, Echevarria, Ron Moore, and Naren Shankar (Moore’s college pal) worked on TNG.

One: Seven of Nine. Do you wish to rejoin the Collective?

Seven: Voyager is my Collective.

J. Paul Boehmer, who plays the Borg drone One, was the SS officer in The Killing Game, Parts I & II. One’s body armor has an unusual-looking composition, as well as tubing at the ribs, legs and shoulders that glows blue. Seven shows more of her humanity (feelings) as she cares for One (like a mother). The ending where One realizes his continued existence presents a danger to Voyager was very touching (get ready to cry). There is some fine acting and nice character moments here. Even Neelix (used in earlier seasons for comedy) has serious scenes where he makes One feel “at home.”

“Drone” opens with Seven looking into a mirror, practicing her smile. This is a wonderful scene. It works on the “cute” level, but there’s a lot going on under the surface. It’s quite clear that her smile is completely superficial. Seven doesn’t feel like smiling, and she can’t “feel” the smile when she makes it. It’s just there. And knowing that frustrates her. In 20 seconds, without a single line of dialog, “Drone” has already managed to say something interesting about Seven: She’s trying, but she’s just not there yet—and it may be quite some time before she is.

-Jammer’s Reviews

Episode 4: In the Flesh

Janeway: Directive 010: “Before engaging alien species in battle, any and all attempts to make first contact and achieve non-military resolution must be made.” In this case, we made first contact over a year ago and we barely got out of it alive. It seems to me a battle is inevitable, maybe even war. So why can’t I get that directive out of my mind?

The crew of Voyager discover a simulation of Starfleet Headquarters being run by Species 8472 (whoa)! With the aid of regular doses of drugs, Species 8472 are able to shape-shift into human form. It is up to Janeway to try to convince the aliens that Starfleet is not a threat to them. We see Boothby (Ray Walston- who appeared on TNG), Cmdr. Valerie Archer (Kate Vernon- later part of ensemble on Battlestar Galactica), and Adm. Bullock (Tucker Smallwood).

[Chakotay prepares to reenter the alien recreation of Starfleet Headquarters]

Tom: Do you always arm yourself before a first date?

Harry: You’ve never had a date with Species 8472.

Tom: Personally, I don’t go out with girls from other galaxies.

Harry: You’re a true explorer, Chakotay.

Tom: Is she cute?

Chakotay: In her human form, anyway.

Harry: I’ve always wondered what it would be like to date an alien.

Chakotay: I’ll take notes.

The teleplay was written by Nick Sagan, son of astronomer/author/educator Carl Sagan. The original script was based around the idea of Species 8472 visiting ancient Earth and inspiring legends of demons and devils. One scene would have been Janeway’s nightmare that Species 8472 are destroying Bloomington, IN (her hometown). Those ideas were rejected to cut the cost of visual effects, so Sagan came up with a Cold War parable, using past writings of his father as inspiration.

Though the long-time fans are divided on this, it’s a fun ep w/ the idealism we saw in TOS. It’s refreshing to see Earth (even if it’s not the real version). Some viewers were disappointed that Species 8472 turned out to be not as scary as expected. This is one of Beltran’s fave eps; he gets to go undercover and have a bit of romance.

Episode 6: Timeless

[Chakotay has second thoughts about using the new slipstream drive]

Janeway: I know it’s a risk. Probably our biggest one yet. But I’m willing to take it. Are you with me?

Chakotay: Always.

15 yrs. in the future, Harry Kim and Chakotay break Starfleet laws to change the past and prevent a catastrophe that grounds Voyager and kills the rest of her crew, all b/c Harry thought he figured out how to work slipstream drive. Starfleet authorities soon come breathing down their necks; Harry races to send a message back through time to stop himself. This is one of the most highly-rated , by both fans and critics. It was directed by LeVar Burton; he also has a brief cameo.

Seven of Nine: [staring at her hand] My visual processors and motor cortex – they’re malfunctioning.

The Doctor: Sounds like a problem with your cortical implant. We’d better have a look. [He tries to scan Seven with a tricorder, but she drifts off] Hold still.

Seven: I cannot comply.

The Doctor: You’re intoxicated!

Seven: Impossible.

The Doctor: Your blood synthehol level is .05 percent. How many glasses of champagne did you consume?

Seven: One.

The Doctor: Obviously, the Borg can’t hold their liquor.

The (present) opening party scene in Engineering was to inaugurate the slipstream drive and to celebrate the series’ 100th ep. Some viewers were surprised that (future) Chakotay joined Harry in his plan; he seems like a man who’d have gone on w/ his life. The presence of his lover Tessa (Christine Harnos) on this illegal mission seemed odd to also go some viewers; she has no agenda beyond following Chakotay’s lead and listening to his concerns. Chakotay has doubts about what he is about to do, but I don’t think those doubts are developed enough.

“Timeless” is a confidently told tale of guilt. As we learn in the “present,” the crew’s attempt to get home with this experimental quantum slipstream drive is something that has been months in the making. […] Harry believes he has devised a solution—he says he can compensate for the flaw from the Delta Flyer, essentially leading the way for the Voyager crew—but this carries with it a substantial risk.

Garrett Wang, in one of his best performances to date, paints future Harry as guilt-ridden to the point of obsession. This is a changed man, both in ideology and attitude. Gone is the pleasant, youthful Ensign, and in his place is a weathered, sullen, impatient man who will do whatever it takes to give himself a second chance in the past. He has resigned from Starfleet and come up with a very illegal plan.

-Jammer’s Reviews

Episode 7: Infinite Regress

Seven of Nine begins to exhibit multiple personalities from a wide range of disparate species. The culprit? An ailing Borg “Vinculum” broadcasting a neural interlink frequency from the center of a debris field from an exploded Borg cube. As the crew try to dismantle it, Seven’s neutral pattern dissipates, allowing other personalities to take over. Tuvok steps in, just as an unfamiliar alien culture challenges Voyager for the Vinculum. 

[Seven hands over star charts and sociological data for Naomi Wildman to study]

Seven: As Bridge Assistant, you will find this information relevant.

Naomi: Consider it assimilated.

This is an episode that could’ve come off as pedestrian, but thanks to the skilled David Livingston (one of my favorite Trek directors) it ends up being intriguing and at times fairly intense and haunting.

What’s causing Seven to experience “Borg multiple personality disorder,” you ask? The crew’s investigation leads it to the debris of a destroyed Borg vessel, where they find the Borg ship’s “vinculum” is still functioning. The vinculum suppresses individuality in Borg drones, regulating and organizing their thought patterns for maximum efficiency in the hive mind. this vinculum is transmitting a signal that is causing Seven’s brain implants to malfunction and bring forward the repressed personalities of other individuals the Borg had assimilated. The crew must now shut down the vinculum in order to solve Seven’s problem.

-Jammer’s Reviews

This was a lighthearted ep (written by Jimmy Diggs) where Ryan gets to show a wider range of acting skills. While Seven plays a game with Naomi (and her personality is that of a little girl) we see the reflection of this little girl in the Kadis-kot game board. Among Seven’s personalities is a Krenim scientist, w/ whom Janeway has been debating “the finer points of temporal physics” (a callback to S4, E8-9: Year of Hell, Pts. I & II). When Seven emulates the son of K’Vok, she says to B’Elanna “You are a desirable woman” (in Klingon); this matches her body language and initiating a mating ritual.

[Torres reacts warily when seeing Seven in Engineering]

Seven: Don’t worry, Lieutenant; the son of K’Vok will not be joining us.

B’Elanna: Glad to hear it. Does this qualify as our second date?

The Doctor: Just think of me as your chaperone.

Episode 8: Nothing Human

Ensign Tabor: Crell Moset killed thousands of people in his hospitals. As long as we’re willing to benefit from his research, we’re no better than he is.

An injured cytoplasmic alien attaches itself to Lt. B’Lanna Torres, using her body to assist it’s injured body. The Doctor calls up a holographic recreation of a Cardassian exobiologist, Dr. Crell Moset (David Clennon), to consult. B’Elanna refuses treatment when it’s discovered that the real Moset was guilty of war crimes for tortuous experiments resulting in thousands of Bajoran deaths. This is the final series ep written by co-creator Jeri Taylor.

Dr. Crell Moset: How do you suppose your own database was developed? Hm? My God, half the medical knowledge acquired on Earth came through experiments on lower animals.

The Doctor: But not people!

Dr. Crell Moset: It’s convenient to draw a line between higher and lower species, isn’t it?

Outside of DS9, the only eps in which events surrounding the Bajoran Occupation played a major role were TNG: Ensign Ro and this one. Picardo loved dhe opportunity to work w/ Clennon (his good friend). Moset is based on Josef Mengele, the Nazi scientist who performed brutal medical experiments on human “guinea pigs” deemed “inferior” and not worthy of life (according to Nazi creed).

The real issue here is whether or not medical knowledge obtained through inhumane methods is morally right to use to benefit another. On more than one occasion, “Nothing Human” does a reasonably good job at tackling this question. There are several interesting arguments between Doc and Krell about ethics (leading to Krell’s most intriguingly troubling line, “Ethics are arbitrary”). But the problem is, by putting so much ambiguity in the nature of Krell, the story often doesn’t seem to know whether the other characters object to the idea of using his knowledge, or if they simply object to the idea of Krell himself.

What if Krell’s medical database had been downloaded into a hologram of a Starfleet doctor? The answer: No one would have given it a second thought.

-Jammer’s Reviews

Episode 10: Counterpoint

Kashyk: Captain, do you trust me?

Janeway: Not for a second.

Kashyk: Exactly! And why should you? Trust has to be earned. It’s gradual, and yet it’s the foundation of every relationship, professional and personal. It’s also a concept alien to the telepathic races. Why take someone at their word when you can simply read their mind?

Voyager is traveling through a vast sector of space controlled by a powerful alien race (the Devore) which is deeply suspicious of telepathic lifeforms. The presence of Tuvok, Ensign Vorik, and a dozen telepathic refugees (the Brenari) force the crew to conceal them in order to pass through safely. The group is held in suspension inside the transporter, so that they disappear during inspections! After the third inspection, Voyager is approached by a scout ship carrying only the chief Devore inspector, Kashyk (Mark Harelik). He knows that Janeway has telepaths on board and how she is hiding them. But now, Kashyk isn’t trying to catch them, as he wants to defect! The teleplay was written by Michael Taylor; he wrote 13 eps of the show. Taylor’s episode (The Visitor) on DS9 ranks as one of the most popular of that series. He started out as a freelancer, then went on to work on some high quality shows, incl. Battlestar Galactica, TURN: Washington Spies, and Into the Badlands.

Janeway: You’ll have your own quarters but limited access to Voyager’s systems, and your whereabouts will be monitored at all times.

Kashyk: I’m used to being surrounded by armed guards. Makes me feel secure.

Janeway: Only this time, they answer to me. Consider them a reminder that Voyager is my ship.

Kashyk: I don’t think anyone could doubt that.

Mulgrew objected (early on in the show) to romance w/ any of the men on the Voyager crew (incl. Paris and Chakotay); the producers were trying to push that for Janeway. Fans (no doubt) also noticed the chemistry between Mulgrew and Beltran (esp. in the first two seasons). We learned in Hunters (S4 , E5) that Janeway’s former fiance, Mark, moved on w/ his life and got married to his co-worker. A good time has passed, so Mulgrew suggested a romance, even recommending Harelik (primarily a theater actor) as the love interest.

The relationship here reminded me somewhat of the one between the female Romulan commander and Spock in The Enterprise Incident (TOS: S3, E2). Spock deceived the Romulan commander to get the cloaking device (as that was his job as First Officer), but they shared mutual admiration, respect, and attraction. Spock admits to her finally: “Military secrets are the most fleeting of all. I hope that you and I… exchanged something more permanent.”

[Janeway has been deceived earlier by Inspector Kashyk]

Kashyk: You created false readings.

Janeway: That is the theme for this evening, isn’t it?

Deceit is the name of the game. The game is the whole point… …it works because it ultimately makes for an enjoyable Janeway feature. It deftly reveals her human weaknesses and emotional vulnerabilities while at the same time showing her ability to remain a focused, resourceful, sensible, and intelligent captain.

-Jammer’s Reviews

An early scene starts off with Mahler’s Symphony No. 1, a digression from the usual background music of Trek… We hear an example of “counterpoint”: counter-melodies playing against one another.

…Captain Janeway and Inspector Kashyk are counterpoints themselves, two leaders who play against each other – not through phasers but through wits. Their tension occurs on multiple levels: sexuality, trust, and power. In the end, Kashyk is revealed to be untrustworthy after all, so they are destined to remain rival counterpoints.

– Excerpt from IMDB review

Episode 11: Latent Image

The Doctor uncovers evidence his memory was erased 18 mos. ago. Nearly all traces of a crewman and an away mission were erased by Janeway! Confronted by The Doctor’s need for answers and Seven of Nine’s perspective on the rights of a hologram, Janeway restores the fatal truth about Ensign Jetal, The Doctor’s choice that led to her death, and his resulting breakdown.

Seven: When you separated me from the Collective, I was an unknown risk to your crew. Yet you kept me on board. You allowed me to evolve into an individual.

Janeway: You’re a human being. He’s a hologram.

Seven: And you allowed that hologram to evolve as well, to exceed his original programming. And yet, now you choose to abandon him.

Janeway: Objection noted. Good night.

Seven: It is unsettling. You say that I am a human being, and yet I am also Borg – part of me not unlike your replicator. Not unlike the Doctor. Will you one day choose to abandon me as well? I have always looked to you as my example, my guide to humanity. Perhaps I’ve been mistaken.

Robert Picardo gets an opportunity to show off a greater acting range as the Doctor starts to get understandably paranoid and break down. It also gave Kate Mulgrew an opportunity to portray her character in a slightly less favorable light than usual. …Scarlett Pomers was delightful as Naomi Wildman; the most realistic child in any Star Trek series.

-Excerpt from IMDB review

Episodes 15 & 16: Dark Frontier

In the 1st hour of this telefilm (which originally aired during FEB “Sweeps Week”), members of the Voyager crew train on the holodeck for a raid on a Borg ship to steal the trans-warp coil (in hopes of integrating the ship). The Borg seem to be one step ahead when the Borg Queen (Susanna Thompson) communicates w/ Seven. In flashbacks, the USS Raven is carrying a crew w/ only Magnus Hansen (Kirk Baily), his wife Erin (Laura Interval), and their very young daughter, Annika (Katelin Petersen).

In the 2nd hour, Janeway is won’t give up on her crewmate/friend 2 yrs. after being liberated from the Collective, Seven rejoins the Borg, seemingly of her own will. When Janeway finds a history of transmissions from the Borg to Seven, she is convinced that Seven was lured back against her wishes. Aboard the Borg sphere, the Borg Queen attempts to seduce Seven into helping her assimilate Earth.

The Doctor: [on the Borg research of Seven’s parents] This is an important stage of your social development, Seven. Try not to think of it as simply a research project but as an exploration of how you were raised.

Seven of Nine: My parents underestimated the Collective. They were destroyed. Because of their arrogance, I was raised by Borg.

***

Janeway [to a worried Naomi after Seven leaves Voyager]: There are three things to remember about being a starship captain: keep your shirt tucked in, go down with the ship… and never abandon a member of your crew.

Seven (at Janeway’s request) reads her parents’ data logs; she’d been avoiding bad memories (from her life before being assimilated). Braga and Menosky (who wrote the teleplay) invent a backstory where the Hansens are rogue scientists on a mission to find the mysterious Borg. They became obsessed w/ this idea, disregarded orders and warnings from colleagues, and traveled alone (eventually to the Delta Quadrant)! They even boarded the cube and kidnapped sleeping drones from their regeneration alcoves to study them (whoa)! I wondered WTF kind of irresponsible parents are these!? After 3 yrs, they get too cocky, run out of luck, and are assimilated. There is a fine scene where Seven asks Janeway to allow her to stay on the mission, even though she has been distracted lately by her emotions. Seven knows something; she is ready to sacrifice herself for the crew.

If “Dark Frontier” was trying to get my attention with pure cinematic audacity, it worked. The episode wastes no time in coming out big and bold, showing off production values in an entertainingly effective way. David Bell’s score comes out stronger than music is normally ever permitted to be on Trek episodes…

…I’d like to comment on a character whose actions have long been controversial and inconsistently written. I find myself reminded of second season’s “Alliances.” At the end of that episode, the writers alleged that, in light of being stuck in the chaotic Delta Quadrant surrounded by brutal opportunistic enemies, Janeway’s course of adjustment would simply be to maintain Federation morals… I found that attitude to be shallow, naive, and dramatically limiting.

Over the years of Voyager’s uneasy run, that attitude has been changed. Now we have a Janeway that, while still maintaining diplomacy and a sense of morality, will go further to protect her crew and get them home more quickly.

-Jammer’s Reviews

Episode 18: Course: Oblivion

[Seven catches the wedding bouquet]

The Doctor: Congratulations.

Seven: For what?

Tuvok: You may not want to know.

Paris and Torres get married, the enhanced warp drive is up and running, Voyager could travel home in about 2 yrs (wow)! The honeymoon is put on hold when the molecular cohesion of the ship and its crew starts breaking down. When Torres suddenly dies, Tuvok and Chakotay realize that they aren’t the original crew; they’re the silver-blood copies left behind on the “Demon Class” planet 10 mos. ago (S4, E24: Demon)! As others die, Chakotay tries to convince Janeway to return to that planet, reminding her that Earth isn’t their home.

Janeway: The way I choose to look at it is this: if everything about us was duplicated, that includes our memory engrams, the emotional centers of our brain. So if you feel something, remember something, believe something – I’m not about to tell you it’s not real.

The first clue that this in fact isn’t the real Voyager and crew is that Tom holds the rank of Lt. Jr. Grade (w/ one light pip and one dark on his collar); he was demoted to Ensign in S5 E9: Thirty Days (w/ only one light pip). Another clue is that the copies of Tuvok and Chakotay mention encounters w/ the Kmada and the N’Kree (aliens which Voyager never met). Some long-time fans pointed out that Janeway and Chakotay are more friendly (touchy-feely) in the copied ship; I noticed this on my 2nd watch. Somehow the copies were able to adapt to a different atmosphere than the one found on their Class Y planet; in Demon they suffocated in a nitrogen-oxygen atmosphere. (Get ready to cry, like you did for Drone)!

[1] There’s a lot of tension in this episode, both from the fact that anyone can die (including series regulars) and the conflict between the crew. This was still the era when they were having fun exploring the Chakotay/ Janeway relationship and there’s some real pathos after their divide becomes irrevocable.

[2] What is important is that you see good people, who try so hard, make some right decisions and some wrong decisions, and fail. This crew trades for a better warp engine that puts them far ahead of the real ship. This Tom Paris has the guts to marry B’Ellana Torres. Janeway is a starship captain, whether mimetic or made of flesh and blood, and her mission is to go back to Earth.

[3] It’s interesting that the writers would give their audience, so used to tidy, happy endings, such a bleak one this time. We saw an entire race wiped out of existence in this episode, with absolutely nothing of themselves and their accomplishments left behind. Janeway was right when she told her crew that they deserved to be remembered, even if they were copies. This episode wants us to be uncomfortable with the ending.

-Excerpts from IMDB reviews

Episode 22: Someone to Watch Over Me

The Doctor: [Another of the Doctor’s dating lessons, said to a preoccupied Seven] The key to finding a compatible partner is learning how to share your interests and goals. We’ll start with hobbies.

[speaking as if a potential suitor] What do you do with your spare time?

Seven: Regenerate.

The Doctor: Uh-huh. Tell me about you tastes, your likes and dislikes.

Seven: I dislike irrelevant conversations.

The Doctor: Okaaay, which brings us to “goals.” What do you want out of life?

Seven: Perfection.

Taking Janeway’s advice to try dating, Seven undergoes lessons from The Doctor. The story is a twist on a My Fair Lady set in space. Tom Paris places a wager on Seven’s performance at an upcoming reception. The Doctor finds himself falling for his student. Also, Neelix shows a visiting ambassador, Tomin (Scott Thompson- a comedian), around the ship. This is both a funny, clever, and touching ep written by Michael Taylor; it was directed by McNeil.

Steven Price (a hologram in Sandrine’s Bar): Curious jewelry.

Seven: It’s a Borg implant. I was a drone.

Steven Price: Oh, so then it’s a family heirloom.

Seven of Nine: Borg do not have families. They have unimatrices.

Picardo and Ryan did some of their own singing, incl. the duet “You Are My Sunshine.” The dances were choreographed by Laura Behr, wife of DS9 writer/showrunner Ira Steven Behr. I was a bit surprised that Seven (boldly) asked out Lt. Chapman (Brian McNamara), who is nervous around women (according to Tom). During their date, Seven refuses champagne (since synthehol affects her cortical functions); we learned this in Timeless. They order lobster- quite rare for a first date nowadays (LOL)!

In the B-plot, Neelix plays host to Tomin, who comes from a very conservative planet. Meanwhile, his leader and Janeway go down to their planet. On the ship, Tomin wants to cut loose: eating spicy food, drinking at Sandrine’s, and meeting alien women. He gets drunk and hits on Seven (who is not amused)!

As odd as it may seem, this episode in some ways epitomizes what Star Trek is all about. Not the vast philosophical concerns or mysteries of time and space, but the interaction between and among those holding unique perspectives of the universe.

So, how does this episode come to epitomize Star Trek? For its utter compassion, empathy and …well… sweetness. There is a tenderness to it that exists very much at the core of the “mission”. Understanding. Compassion. Peaceful co-existence. And, more than anything, Mutual Respect.

-Excerpt from IMDB review

Episode 24: Relativity

Seven: [describing a causality loop] The Borg once traveled back in time to stop Zephram Cochrane from breaking the warp barrier. They succeeded, but that in turn led the Enterprise to intervene. They assisted Cochrane with the flight the Borg were trying to prevent. Causal loop complete.

Lt. Ducane: So, in a way, the Federation owes its existence to the Borg.

Seven: You’re welcome.

When Voyager is destroyed, Capt. Braxton of the 29th c. time-ship Relativity contacts Seven to travel back in time and discover who planted the temporal disrupter, which she must do w/o being discovered by the past Janeway. The events of Star Trek: First Contact are used as an example for the causality loop (AKA the “Pogo Paradox”). The two incidents Janeway will cause are call-backs to previous eps: Braxton being trapped on 20th c. Earth for 20 yrs. (Future’s End, Pts. I & II) and the Temporal Inversion in the Takara Sector (Timeless). The teleplay was written by Bryan Fuller, Nick Sagan, and Michael Taylor. This is listed as one of the “Ten Essential Episodes” of the show in Star Trek 101 by Paula M. Block and Terry J. Erdmann.

Capt. Braxton: We have a saying in our line of work: There’s no time like the past.

The Pogo Paradox is named for a comic strip syndicated to US newspapers (1948-1975). Pogo was created, written/drawn by Walt Kelly, who coined the phrase “We have met the enemy and he is us” in a 1970 strip. This is the first and only ep to feature the actual Utopia Planitia Fleet Yards. Bruce McGill (who plays Capt. Braxton) was the mischievous BFF (Jack Dalton) on MacGyver. The bridge of the Relativity was a redress of the USS Enterprise-E bridge (seen in First Contact). We (finally) see Seven wearing a Starfleet uniform! Lt. Joe Carey (Josh Clark) appears for the first time since S1; he was replaced as Chief Engineer when B’Elanna was promoted.

[1] This was a good episode and while it isn’t too easy to explain the multi-time line plot, it makes sense when one watches it. It was nice to see Seven in a standard Star Fleet uniform when she goes time travelling…

[2] The show is good but it’s made a bit better because it has a nice sense of humor and never takes itself very seriously.

[3] Relativity is a fast-paced, mind-bending, roller-coaster ride time travel story and stands out as one of the most intriguing, fun episodes.

[4] One of my favorite scenes is near the end of the episode and is extremely subtle, as the present-time Janeway is hiding from past-self Janeway, the camera shows a close up of her face, where she shakes her head in confusion at the paradox. If you blink you would miss it. I do not know if this was scripted or was an ad lib by Kate Mulgrew; either way it made me smile.

-Excerpts from IMDB reviews

Episode 26: Equinox, Part I

Chakotay: [finding one of the Equinox’s crew huddling under debris] I’m Commander Chakotay, USS Voyager.

Ensign Marla Gilmore: But we’re the only humans in the Delta Quadrant.

Chakotay: That’s what we used to think.

***

[Seven calms a crewman while Harry cuts away heavy debris covering his legs]

Seven of Nine: Do not be frightened.

Crewman Noah Lessing: Too late for that.

The premise resembles S1 (when survival in the Delta Quadrant was a serious question). Voyager encounters Equinox, which is another Federation starship trapped in the Delta Quadrant (wow)! Equinox is heavily damaged and running w/ “skeleton” crew. Happy to have found each other, Voyager assists Equinox w/ repairs and the crews get to know each other. Equinox has been stranded in the Delta Quadrant for about 4-5 yrs. after having been (like Voyager) flung across the galaxy by the Caretaker. Equinox wasn’t designed for “long-range tactical missions” (it’s a small science vessel). Capt. Rudy Ransom (John Savage) says that there were many casualties their 1st week in the Delta Quadrant; he lost half of his crew.

Janeway: I couldn’t help but notice, your crew calls you by your first name.

Ransom: When you’ve been in the trenches as long as we have, rank and protocol are luxuries. Besides, we’re a long way from Starfleet Command.

Janeway: I know the feeling.

Ransom: You seem to run a pretty tight ship.

Janeway: We’ve been known to let our hair down from time to time, but I find that maintaining protocol reminds us of where we came from, and hopefully where we’re going.

Equinox has been fighting off a (non-humanoid) alien race from another realm which has been periodically attacking. Voyager is now about 35,000 light years away from the Alpha Quadrant. Unlike most eps, there are 4 new guest actors w/ speaking parts. Lt. Cmdr. Maxwell Burke (a young-ish Titus Welliver- a prolific character actor), is the ex-bf of B’Elanna from their Academy days. Ensign Marla Gilmore (Olivia Birkelund) opens up to Chakotay; she suffers from claustrophobia and PTSD. Crewman Noah Lessing (Rick Worthy- who has appeared on the show previously) is grateful to Seven; he helps her sort through some data.

Ransom: What is the protocol in this situation? We have two captains and two ships. Who gets the last word?

Janeway: “Starfleet Regulation 191, Article 14: In a combat situation involving more than one ship, command falls to the vessel with tactical superiority.” I looked it up this morning.

Ransom: Good thinking.

A “field generator” is developed which would secure both ships if/when the aliens attack, but it’d be more efficient to take a stand on Voyager (as Chakotay suggests). Tension grows between the captains, as it becomes clear Ransom doesn’t intend to abandon his vessel. The main bridge of the Equinox was a re-use of the USS Prometheus, as were corridors, crew quarters and science lab; sets were slightly altered to simulate the effect of damage. In the mess hall, when Harry and Chakotay ask for specifics re: what they were working on in the science lab, Gilmore is (obviously) discomforted and quickly insists some experiments didn’t work. As the Voyager crew prepare a salvage operation, the Equinox bridge crew return to their ship (to gather personal items).

Burke: Once we take their field generator, we’ll part company.

Gilmore: What happens to Voyager?

Burke: They have weapons, shields, a full crew. They’ll survive.

Seven discovers that the Equinox research lab has “high levels of thermionic radiation;” Tuvok says should’ve dissipated already. They go to Janeway and explain that the radiation was there intentionally; Tuvok theorizes that Ransom doesn’t want the Voyager crew to enter that lab. Janeway send in The Doctor (who’ll be immune to the gases as a hologram); she doesn’t reveal this plan to Ransom. The Doctor beams to the lab, finds a dead creature inside a chamber, then scans some logs. He thinks the biomatter was converted to a source of power.

Ransom: Starfleet Regulation 3, paragraph 12: “In the event of imminent destruction, a captain is authorized to preserve the lives of his crew by any justifiable means.”

Janeway: I doubt that protocol covers mass murder.

Ransom: In my judgement, it did.

Janeway: Unacceptable.

While Ransom and Burke are discussing their next plan, security officers approach and take the captain to meet w/ Janeway. She now knows that Ransom and crew used members of the attacking alien race to enhance their warp drive. Ransom reveals the truth of the dire situation they were under (running out of power, starving) when they found an M-Class planet; they met the Ankari and got some food and supplies. In a religious ritual, the Ankari summoned their “Spirits of Good Fortune” (the aliens) who were actually “nucleogenic life forms… emitting high levels of antimatter.” Equinox crew traded some of their tech for a “summoning device” and captured an alien which died (before Ransom could set it free).

Ransom: It’s easy to cling to principles when you’re standing on a vessel with its bulkheads intact, manned by a crew that’s not starving.

Janeway: It’s never easy, but if we turn our backs on our principles, we stop being human.

The Doctor calls up the the Equinox EMH, but that was a bad idea, as that doctor had his “ethical subroutines” deleted. The evil EMH steals The Doctor’s mobile emitter and poses as him on Voyager, even helping Ransom’s crew breakout! Janeway had imprisoned them in their room w/ only 2 security personnel outside. The cliffhanger leaves Equinox in retreat w/ The Doctor and Seven held hostage. Voyager shields have failed and it’s under attack by the aliens; it seems like Janeway was directly hit (in the final scene)!

…brings back a number of familiar themes previously explored exclusively on Voyager… Themes that remind us we’re in the Delta Quadrant, removed from Starfleet and its safe haven… and possibly removed from its rules given certain circumstances.

-Jammer’s Reviews

I liked the character moments in this ep; that is considered one of the strong suits of Braga’s co-writer (Menosky). Savage (a veteran of TV/theater) inhabits the role of a world-weary captain who’s seen too much and suffered tragedies. Welliver usually plays shady characters (as several viewers noted); he is charming in the scenes w/ B’Elanna, yet also hiding secrets. One long-time fan of the ST universe commented that Ransom was put into this show, but he’d fit better on DS9. After the conference room where the two captains face-off, I was reminded of this speech by Sisko from S2, E21 of DS9 (The Maquis, Pt. II).

Sisko: …It’s easy to be a saint in paradise, but the Maquis do not live in paradise. Out there in the demilitarized zone all the problems haven’t been solved yet. Out there, there are no saints, just people-angry, scared, determined people who are going to do whatever it takes to survive, whether it meets with Federation approval or not.

“Star Trek: Voyager” (Season 4)

Introduction

What is this show all about? Honestly, it’s tough to say (even after binge-watching for over a month of quarantine)! The series changed direction and purpose somewhere during S2; S3 and S4 have proven often is that Voyager is a series that wanders. With its technical resources (budgets are obviously higher in S4) and mostly strong cast, I think it’s capable of being better. The status quo must occasionally be shattered. We have to feel like we’re going somewhere. We need more characters to be developed, as we’ve seen w/ Capt. Janeway, Seven of Nine, and The Doctor. I want to see this crew taking actions and living w/ the consequences. Characters need to evolve and learn from their pasts. With the end of S4 also came the end of Jeri Taylor’s executive producer duties. Brannon Braga took over the creative processes (becoming showrunner).

Paris and Torres relationship is getting more serious, but it comes across as under-developed; the actors are doing their best. Harry and Neelix have continued to be all over the place; they have their (few) moments, but then return to being annoying (b/c of how they are written). Tuvok needs more time onscreen and better dialogue; we know he can do a lot w/ little (though that’s not fair to the actor). Chakotay didn’t get much to do in S4; he mainly gives moral support to Janeway; the actor wasn’t happy w/ the quality of scripts. Ever since he and Janeway reached that agreement in Scorpion, Part II, Chakotay hasn’t given his opinion or insight, or shown much personality. I’d like to know what he’s really thinking, even if disagreeing w/ Janeway.

Also, the aliens need to be more interesting! The Delta Quadrant races exist solely for the sake conflict. The Hirogen were in 6 eps; they were the primary aliens of this season. Since the Hirogen were pack hunters, their purpose most of the time was to seek out and destroy the starship Voyager, which isn’t a fresh approach to alien encounters. Why can’t we see alien cultures who are peaceful and tell us a little something about humanity? Why are so many aliens stock villain types?

Season 4: Selected Episodes

Episode 1: Scorpion, Part II 

[suffering from neural damage, Janeway puts Chakotay in charge of the ship and the mission]

Janeway: [lying on what could be her deathbed] They’ll push you, they’ll threaten you, but they need you. They need this alliance. You have to make this work. I want you… to make this work. Get this crew… home.

To facilitate the Voyager/Borg alliance, the Borg assign Seven of Nine (Jeri Ryan) to communicate w/ Capt. Janeway (Kate Mulgrew) and Lt. Tuvok (Tim Russ) while developing a weapon against Species 8472. Meanwhile, as the Doctor’s modified Borg nanoprobes successfully attack Ensign Kim’s (Garrett Wang) alien infection, Kes (Jennifer Lien) continues to experience a psychic link w/ Species 8472 (which gets strong and scary). Through Kes, Species 8472 learns the purpose of the alliance and attacks!

Chakotay: Seven of Nine said that we lacked the cohesion of a collective mind, that one day it would divide us and destroy us – and here we are, proving her point.

Janeway: I’ll tell you when we lost control of this situation, when we made our mistake. It was the moment we turned away from each other. We don’t have to stop being individuals to get through this; we just have to stop fighting each other.

The title refers to the Aesop fable re: the scorpion and the fox (or frog) which we learn in the S3 finale. The music here is intense and gives a sense of foreboding. Mulgrew is great (as always); her decision to ally w/ the Borg was just whoa! Her convo w/ Chakotay (Robert Beltran) in sickbay and then w/ Seven in the Ready Room are standout scenes. Chakotay thinks the Captain is mistaken; this is consistent w/ his Maquis roots.

Episode 2: The Gift

Janeway: [summarizing Tuvok’s report] I’ve got an Ocampan who wants to be something more and a Borg who’s afraid of becoming something less. Here’s to Vulcan stability.

Seven of Nine resists as her natural human physiology begins to regenerate. It’s up to Janeway to convince her to embrace her humanity and join the Voyager crew. Kes’ telekinetic powers grow to such a point that she can no longer control them; she decides she must leave the ship. 

[Janeway shows Seven of Nine the picture of a little girl]

Janeway: Do you remember her? Her name was Annika Hansen. She was born on Stardate 25479, at the Tendara Colony. There’s still a lot we don’t know about her. Did she have any siblings? Who were her friends? Where did she go to school? What was her favorite color?

Seven of Nine: Irrelevant! Take me back to the Borg!

Jennifer Lien leaving the series officially came about when the staff felt that Kes character arc had been taken as far as it would go; the actress was released from her contract. The entire cast was upset by this decision; they took Lien out to dinner and Mulgrew even drove her home. Garrett Wang stated that he was originally the one at risk of being fired, as he and (writer-producer) Rick Berman didn’t get along. Then, Wang was featured in People‘s 50 Most Beautiful People edition, so the producers decided to keep him and write Lien out instead. Ethan Phillips stated that another goodbye scene between Neelix and Kes was taped, but didn’t make it into this ep. This gift refers to Kes throwing Voyager closer toward Earth (9,500 light years or 10 yrs at maximum warp).

Episode 4: Nemesis

Cmdr. Chakotay’s shuttle is hit by enemy cross-fire and crashes on a planet in the midst of a war. One side (the Vori) befriends him and attempts to help him locate his shuttle. He finds himself quickly taking sides; when captured by the other side (the Kradin), he is reminded that every army has its own story. The teleplay for this ep was written by Kenneth Biller; I’ve liked most of his work so far.

This is a “bottle episode” where we follow Chakotay and a group of young Vori soldiers; one is a newbie hesitant about facing the enemy. While the Vori look like humans, the Kradin have a vicious/unpleasant look (despite their good intentions, as we eventually learn). The makeup of the Kradin resembles that of the Nausicaans from TNG: Tapestry, Fek’lhr from TNG: Devil’s Due, as well as the title character from Predator. The Kradin uniforms were reuses of the Mokra uniforms from the S1 ep Resistance.

[last lines]

Chakotay: I wish it were as easy to stop hating as it was to start.

I think this episode is really cool and brings up issues like propaganda, perspective, and brainwashing in times of war. I actually like the different speech. It is part of being able to hear how Chakotay is brought into this different world. The more he uses the language the more is on the side of the Vori. In the Trek universe this could be explained as maybe the universal translators don’t always get it 100% how the Federation would speak.

-Excerpt from IMDB review

Episode 6: The Raven

Amid Janeway’s negotiations w/ a xenophobic race of aliens (the Bomar) for passage through their region of space, talks are disrupted when Seven of Nine (believing herself summoned by the Borg) leaves Voyager to rejoin the Collective, heading into the aliens’ territory. The teleplay for this ep was co-written by Bryan Fuller (a huge fan of the ST universe); it was directed by LeVar Burton (Geordi La Forge on TNG).

The Doctor: [to Seven] You could be experiencing some sort of post-traumatic stress disorder.

Janeway: Makes sense. You were assimilated by the Borg. You’ve gone through an intense, prolonged trauma.

Seven of Nine: I was not traumatized, I was raised by the Borg. I don’t see them as threatening. Why would I experience fear?

Seven of Nine’s silver bodysuit was replaced by a more understated/less restrictive brown one; it also had a higher neckline. This story resembles TNG: Brothers, where Cmdr. Data, as the result of being summoned by his creator (Dr. Noonian Soong) takes over the Enterprise. We see Seven experience PTSD, we learn more re: her parents- the Hansons- who researched the Borg for several years.

There are times when Voyager feels like a cheap imitation of the TNG, and there are times when Voyager is good, fun and unique. This is one of the latter. This episode explores the re-adaptation of Seven of Nine’s humanity.

-Excerpt from IMDB review

…Neelix introduces her to the concept of eating food, which is milked for some engaging, low-key humor. (How do you teach someone how to chew and swallow? I’m not sure, but Neelix seems like an appropriate instructor.) Jeri Ryan is a joy to watch here.

These are the types of things that we need to see. Being (A) the new character on the series, and (B) the Voyager take on the humanity commentary and identity seeker—a character vital on any Trek series—are two things that make Seven a fountain of storytelling potential.

-Jammer’s Reviews

Episodes 8 & 9: Year of Hell, Parts I & II

Part I: Voyager enters the “Year of Hell” that Kes reported in S3 E21 (Before and After). A Krenim timeship, lead by Capt. Annorax (Kurtwood Smith), aims to rewrite regional history by selectively wiping out entire species of warp-capable humanoids from ever existing. Though many light years away, Voyager, in protecting itself w/ temporal shielding from a foe, becomes a fly in the ointment of Annorax’ plan for 100% restoration of the Krenim Imperium.

Part II: A year into the battle with the Krenim, a stripped down and barely functioning Voyager w/ a skeleton crew is leading an armada of various species’ ships against the timeship before more damage is done. Meanwhile, as “guests” of Annorax, Chakotay and Paris individually pursue solutions to the crisis from the other end.

[Janeway declines a watch Chakotay has given her as a birthday present]

Janeway: That watch represents a meal, a hypospray, or a pair of boots. It could mean the difference between life and death one day.

Whoa- can you believe how cool and gritty this show could be!? The teleplay was written by Brannon Braga (also co-EP) and his frequent collaborator, Joe Menosky. This was originally supposed to be the S3 finale; there were some minor rewrites, w/ many of Kes’s lines given to Seven of Nine. Braga ideally would’ve had this arc be one season long (UPN said no way); when he wanted to have it as 4 eps (Berman said no- he wanted to keep things episodic). This show’s writers didn’t have the freedom which DS9 had, unfortunately!

The intro narration by Janeway states: “Space, the great unknown. Only now we’re going to know it a little better.” This is a reference to the narration by Capt. Kirk during the intro of each episode of TOS. Seven of Nine tells Kim and Torres that the Borg were present when Zefram Cochrane launched his first warp-driven starship. She claims it is “complicated”- an acknowledgment of the events of Star Trek: First Contact, in which the Borg travel through time to assimilate humans. This is the first (continued) appearance of Janeway’s short hairstyle. Neelix (Ethan Phillips) wears the gold Starfleet uniform, having been commissioned as a security officer. Smith also played the Efrosian Federation President in Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country and DS9: Things Past. His right-hand man is Obrist, played by John Loprieno (One Life to Live).

Tuvok: …I have never understood the Human compulsion to emotionally bond with inanimate objects. This vessel has done nothing. It is an assemblage of bulkheads, conduits, tritanium. Nothing more.

Janeway: Oh, you’re wrong. It’s much more than that. This ship has been our home. It’s kept us together. It’s been part of our family. As illogical as this might sound, I feel as close to Voyager as I do to any other member of my crew. It’s carried us, Tuvok – even nurtured us. And right now, it needs one of us.

This is listed as one of the “Ten Essential Episodes” of Voyager in the 2008 reference book Star Trek 101 by Paula M. Block and Terry J. Erdmann. This story was inspired greatly by Jules Verne’s 20,000 Leagues Under The Sea. The name “Annorax” was derived from the main character Pierre Aronnax; Paris compares Annorax to Captain Nemo (the antagonist of Verne’s story). This ep was nominated for an Emmy Award for Outstanding Special Visual Effects for a Series. Ron Moore (a former writing partner of Braga) used this script as an example of how the series should’ve proceeded all along.

This is the only time we see Janeway relieved of command (momentarily) by The Doctor, on the grounds that she is suffering from Traumatic Stress Syndrome. Voyager is shown as being very damaged; acrylic sheets (similar to those used when the sets are in storage) was draped over most of the “clean” bulkheads, and then sprayed w/ charcoal dust to simulate the effects of many explosions. This resulted in many surfaces having a “wrinkled” look (which I noticed on my second viewing).

[1] It showed a nasty, dark side to Star Trek that had rarely been seen before, and was beautifully acted by nearly everyone. …the way this episode is shot, the sense of fear and terror that runs through it is magnificent and not something you would expect from Star Trek.

[2] This was another exciting episode where the crew actually get hurt, including the captain who is badly scarred in a fire. It was just a shame the story couldn’t have been stretched a bit longer as it was good to see the usually pristine Voyager battle-scarred.

-Excerpts from IMDB reviews

Episode 14: Message in a Bottle

Seven of Nine’s discovery of a tenuous link to the Federation excites Janeway. When the normal method for sending messages proves inadequate, sending the Doctor (a hologram) might work. The Doctor beams over to the Prometheus (at the far edge of the Alpha Quadrant), a prototype starship captured by Romulans. The Doctor finds an ally in EMH-2, a new/untested prototype, played by Andy Dick (NewsRadio). EMH-2’s line “I’m a doctor, not a commando!” is a running gag which all doctors in various ST series have said. This ep introduces the Hirogen, a new alien race/adversary to Voyager crew.

Judson Scott (Romulan Commander Rekar) also played baddie roles in Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan and TNG: Symbiosis. Although the Dominion is referenced in several ST shows, this is the only reference the Dominion War outside of DS9 and Star Trek: Insurrection. This makes sense, since Voyager was stuck in the Delta Quadrant for the entire Dominion War. We see the (new/DS9-style) uniform that’s worn by Alpha Quadrant Starfleet personnel from now on. The crew of Voyager never wears the updated uniforms; this would’ve probably exhausted their limited replicator rations. The show runners probably wanted to keep the older (color on top) uniforms to differentiate from the cast of DS9.

[1] There is a lot of humor in this, but the serious nature of it involves a possible connection to Earth and home. There is some really fun byplay between the two holographic personages and this highlights this episode.

[2] This comedy ends in a success once the doctor returns to Voyager and tells Janeway that he contacted Starfleet in a short scene that’s extremely warm and touching.

-Excerpts from IMDB reviews

Episode 15: Hunters

Through the vast Hirogen communications net (which we learned of in E14), Voyager crewmen receive unexpected letters from home. As many fans have noted, even on the late ’90s, computer networks were well-established. The mail wouldn’t need to be put on a stack of PADDS, but could’ve been distributed via something like an email server. Later, Tuvok and Seven get captured by the tall/intimidating aliens- the Hirogen- who live to hunt and collect trophies of their defeated prey. Tiny Ron (Alpha Hirogen) had a recurring DS9 role as Maihar’du, Grand Nagus Zek’s protective/silent servant. Since this teleplay was written by Jeri Taylor, we get an interesting story (w/ great Janeway/Chakotay scenes) .

[Janeway has learned that her fiancé has married somebody else]

Janeway: I guess I didn’t really expect him to wait for me, considering the circumstances, but it made me realize that I was using him as a safety net, you know, as a way to avoid becoming involved with someone else.

Chakotay: You don’t have that safety net anymore.

Janeway: That’s right. Then again, my life is far from uneventful here in the Delta Quadrant. It’s not like I would’ve had a chance to pursue a relationship, even if I HAD realized I was alone.

Chakotay: You’re hardly alone – and to my way of thinking, there’s still plenty of time.

Janeway: Plenty of time.

Chakotay learns that the Maquis have been decimated by the Cardassian/Dominion alliance. This is good stuff. The fact that all the Maquis back in the Alpha Quadrant are gone now undoubtedly hits the Maquis population on Voyager pretty hard. Chakotay’s reaction to this devastating news is an especially poignant moment.

The letter she receives is from her (former) fiance Mark… It’s not something that Janeway finds particularly surprising; it’s just that the fact it wasn’t surprising doesn’t make accepting the inevitable any easier. Her mention to Chakotay that the letter had such a “finality” was well said—perfectly said, in fact.

-Excerpts from Jammer’s Reviews

Episode 16: Prey

Chakotay: [of the Hirogen] From what I found in their database, diplomacy isn’t a part of their lifestyle. They don’t see us as equals. To them, we’re simply game.

Janeway: It’s time we convinced them otherwise, or like any cornered animal, we’ll show our teeth.

A Hirogen ship meets up with Voyager, but doesn’t attack; there is one severely injured survivor inside. In taking him aboard for treatment, the ship also acquires the successful attacker- a member of Species 8472 (yikes)! There is a look at Species 8472 walking along the ship’s hull; this is a rare shot for a ST show. The crew team up with the Alpha Hirogen (Tony Todd) to hunt it down, but circumstances bring out Janeway’s desire to apply compassion, which puts her in opposition w/ the Hirogen and also Seven of Nine. Todd played Worf’s brother Kurn (TNG and DS9); he also played the future Jake Sisko in DS9: The Visitor. The EV suits are the same ones seen in Star Trek: First Contact.

Although Janeway lectures Seven by saying “it is wrong to sacrifice another being to save our own lives,” that is what she did in Tuvix, where she forced him to sacrifice his life to restore Tuvok and Neelix. She defended that choice by stating that Tuvix was created as the result of a transporter accident and, therefore, less entitled to exist. This ep lets Ryan spread her wings; of course, Seven is freaked out by Species 8472, but she still has the guts to tell her real feelings to Janeway.

[Janeway has asked Seven of Nine to create a singularity, which Seven refuses]

Seven of Nine: I have agreed to remain on Voyager; I have agreed to function as a member of your crew. But I will not be a willing participant in my own destruction or the destruction of this ship.

Janeway: Objection noted. We’ll do this without you.

Seven of Nine: You will fail.

Janeway: And you have just crossed the line!

***

Chakotay: Is your body armor designed to handle rapid pressure fluctuations?

Alpha Hirogen: It can defeat most hostile environments. I once tracked a silicon-based life-form through the neutronium mantle of a collapsed star.

Tom Paris: I once tracked a mouse through Jefferies tube 32.

***

[last lines]

Seven of Nine: It is puzzling.

Janeway: What’s that?

Seven of Nine: You made me into an individual. You encouraged me to stop thinking like a member of the Collective, to cultivate my independence and my humanity. But when I try to assert that independence, I am punished.

Janeway: Individuality has its limits – especially on a starship where there’s a command structure.

Seven of Nine: I believe that you are punishing me because I do not think the way that you do. Because I am not becoming more like you. You claim to respect my individuality. But in fact, you are frightened by it.

Janeway: As you were.

***

The Hirogen here aren’t played anywhere near as over the top as the two Hirogen in “Hunters.” From the moment “Prey” begins, there’s almost a sense that the writers or director or somebody made a conscious effort to tone down the Hirogen to something that’s …well, watchable.

This is a solidly constructed, very focused story that transcends the lightweight nature typical of season four by addressing a moral issue and framing it in the context of a punchy action/adventure premise.

-Excerpts from Jammer’s Reviews

Episodes 18 & 19: The Killing Game, Parts I & II

Part I: The Hirogen capture Voyager, turning it into one big holodeck, and setting up several scenarios using the crew members as prey. The memories of the crew are suppressed by use of implants and they are given new identities consistent w/ the scenario. Only The Doctor is free to save Voyager

Part II: As Janeway, Seven, Kim and The Doctor struggle to free the minds of their shipmates, dissension looms between the Alpha Hirogen and his subordinates, particularly w/ Turanj. Janeway’s negotiation for a ceasefire w/ the visionary Alpha Hirogen becomes the straw that breaks the camel’s back. As Turanj selects Janeway as his personal prey, the rest of the crew vie against Nazi forces in the ship-wide WWII holodeck simulation. 

Looks like Nazis aren’t played out (old news) in this show! The Hirogen have taken over Voyager and made it into an expansive Holodeck, spreading emitters over many decks. They’ve forced Ensign Kim to maintain this for them, but the emitters suck too much power from the ship’s main systems. The Hirogen shoot, stab, and shunt the crew to Sickbay; the Doctor has an assembly-line to patch them up. Some long-time fans consider this a fun story; others think it lacks subtlety.

The ensemble cast get to wear different hairstyles, period costumes, and (generally) look like they’re having a ball. Janeway is seen as a Klingon in the opening; later, Neelix gathers Klingons to fight the Nazis (which is glorious and hilarious)! Ryan displays her singing talents; she sings “That Old Black Magic” (published in 1942), as well as “It Can’t Be Wrong” (1943), an adaptation of “Charlotte’s Theme” from the soundtrack of Now, Voyager. Seven’s French name is “Mademoiselle de Neuf” (“Miss of Nine”). Dawson was in the final stages of pregnancy in S4, so her pregnancy could be used effectively here, w/o the necessity to film her from the chest up.

This was a good episode even if the WWII setting was a little cliché… at least the problems weren’t due to the holodeck safeties malfunctioning yet again. It also showed some nice character development in the Hirogens when their leader explains how he wanted to use such technology so they wouldn’t spend their lives scattered across the galaxy finding new prey to hunt.

-Excerpts from IMDB reviews

I would like to agree with those who see the episode as fun. I also think it’s very Trekkian, with its portrayal of the good guys as cleverly subversive, always the rebels. Americans have always pictured themselves as underdogs, fighting for freedom.

This is about as meta as its possible to get – the resistance on the ship mirrored with the resistance on the holodeck, Janeway and Seven’s conflict being played out, B’Elanna and Tom having a relationship – and actually there is some satisfaction in the different layers. Harry may have found his strongest role yet. And the whole thing looks gorgeous.

-Comment from Jammer’s Reviews

Episode 21: The Omega Directive

[Janeway is briefing her senior officers about the Omega molecule, its nature and its dangers]

Janeway: Omega destroys subspace. A chain reaction involving a handful of molecules could devastate subspace throughout an entire quadrant. If that were to happen, warp travel would become impossible. Space-faring civilization as we know it would cease to exist.

[…]

I don’t have to tell you what’s at stake. If a large-scale Omega explosion occurs, we will lose the ability to go to warp forever. We’ve got our work cut out for us.

Voyager’s sensors detect a rare particle capable of damaging subspace and nullifying warp travel. Under a classified directive known only to Starfleet captains and a few others, Janeway leads the ship on a mission to destroy all traces of that particle. Seven of Nine hesitates to destroy it, sharing the Borg reverence of it as the embodiment of perfection.

Janeway’s log entries are encrypted throughout this episode; she mentions Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan‘s Dr. Carol Marcus and the Genesis Device. This is the only time that any captain officially rescinds the Prime Directive! Seven tells Janeway that the Omega Particle means “perfection” to the Borg. Dawson went into labor during the production of this ep; we see Torres in Engineering towards the start, but she’s absent when Janeway briefs the senior officers during the special meeting about Omega.

[last lines]

Seven of Nine: For 3.2 seconds, I saw perfection. When Omega stabilized, I felt a curious sensation. As I was watching it, it seemed to be watching me. The Borg have assimilated many species, with mythologies to explain such moments of clarity. I’ve always dismissed them as trivial. Perhaps I was wrong.

Janeway: If I didn’t know you better… I’d say you just had your first spiritual experience.

…it’s just a solid stand-alone science fiction story that is sensibly written and sensibly executed. It’s entertaining and reasonably thoughtful, particularly with some of the characterizations that arise late in the story. As an episode of Voyager, it’s pretty original; watching the episode, I got the feeling that I hadn’t seen this story before.

I was thoroughly impressed and even moved by the effectiveness of Jeri Ryan’s performance and the writers’ ability to give her such good material. The way Ryan delivers these lines is poignant, showing Seven vulnerable, troubled, and emotional…

-Jammer’s Reviews

Episode 23: Living Witness

[first lines]

Janeway: [in the historical simulation] When diplomacy fails, there’s only one alternative: violence. Force must be applied without apology. It’s the Starfleet way.

When The Doctor’s back-up module is found, his program is brought on-line for the first time in 700 years. In the future, the Kyrian Museum of Heritage teaches a history that writes Voyager as playing a detrimental role in beginning their Great War w/ the Vaskans. The Doctor is the only living witness and sets the record straight, but the new “facts” give way to old tensions from the formerly warring races. The museum curator and The Doctor find themselves amidst violence and destruction! This ep was directed by Tim Russ; it’s very highly-rated and popular w/ fans.

[in the historical simulation]

Janeway: [on the brawl between her senior officers] Save it for the holodeck. We’ve got a war to fight.

Some sets here were also used in Star Trek: Insurrection (then in production), w/ the museum doubling as a Son’a ship. This is the only ep that establishes The Doctor as having a backup. The “inaccurate depiction” of The Doctor is similar to the android Data from TNG. The holographic warship has a Kazon ensign. None of the crew of the warship wear rank insignia on their collars or the combadges on their left breast. The normal gray undershirt worn beneath the Starfleet jumpsuit uniform has been changed to black, and many crew members wear black gloves. Some other differences include different hair (Janeway’s) and a tattoo in the style of the Maori on Chakotay. This ep will (no doubt) remind many of the mirror universe of TOS (Mirror, Mirror), TNG: Yesterday’s Enterprise, and/or several DS9 stories.

Quarren: You’re trying to protect yourself.

The Doctor: And so are you – from the truth! Isn’t it a coincidence that the Kyrians are being portrayed in the best possible light? Martyrs, heroes, saviors… Obviously, events have been reinterpreted to make your people feel better about themselves. Revisionist history – it’s such a comfort.

[1] This episode is about how cultures can come or fail to come to grips with the reality of their past. And how those misconceptions and lies can have a lasting crippling effect on the societies. It also demonstrates how difficult it can be to present the truth when you are addressing people who are investing in a more convenient narrative for their own peace of mind, regarding of the evidence.

It’s a great story topic for science fiction which isn’t very often told in an interesting way like the way we see it in this episode. This episode manages to be one of the more insightful and funny episodes of the series.

[2] Bold, edgy, creative and thankfully not so nice and touchy-feely like too many of the show’s other episodes.

-Excerpts from IMDB reviews

Episode 25: One

Seven of Nine: Holodecks are a pointless endeavor, fulfilling some human need to fantasize. I have no such need.

The Doctor: What you need is some editorial skill in your self-expression. Between impulse and action, there is a realm of good taste begging for your acquaintance.

Yikes, this ep is going to come across as too real (nowadays in quarantine life)! An unavoidable poisonous nebula forces the entire crew into stasis chambers, except for The Doctor and Seven of Nine. She must fight her “collective” mentality to handle being alone for over a month, while combating ship-wide failures, an intruder, and her own fears of individuality and loneliness. The teleplay was written by series co-creator Jeri Taylor and directed by Biller (who was mainly a writer). This plot is similar to Persistence of Vision and Bliss, where The Doctor works closely w/ another crew member (Kes; Seven) while most of the crew is incapacitated.

[The Doctor and Seven are crawling through the Jeffries tubes, which are narrow.]

The Doctor: I’ll complain if I want to. It’s comforting.

We learn that Voyager has traveled 15,000 light years toward home (Earth). The stasis room was a redress of the cargo bay set; stasis units also appeared in Resolutions and The Thaw. The Doctor says: “If you had even the slightest sense of humor, you’d realize I was making a small joke;” Seven replies: “Very small.” This is reminiscent of a scene between Chekov and Spock in TOS: The Trouble with Tribbles. A holographic version of Torres says she joined the Maquis after Chakotay saved her life; this was established in Taylor’s novel Pathways.

[1] This was a good episode which gave Jeri Ryan to show a greater acting range as Seven starts to be effected by the solitude.

[2] Despite being almost a one-woman show, this is a pretty good episode. I particularly liked the conversations between her and the crew during the worst of the hallucinations- they were darkly funny. Worth seeing and unique. And, I appreciate the character development in Seven.

-Excerpts from IMDB reviews

Humans are social creatures- and so, it would seem, are Borg (in a twisted manner of speaking). The transition from being part of the Borg collective to being an individual was difficult enough for Seven; now she’s faced with the prospect of being the lone individual in a high-pressure situation. It is more difficult than she could’ve imagined.

…I’ve found Seven of Nine to be the most believably and interestingly written character on the ensemble. Why is it the writers can’t do these stories for anyone else? Maybe it’s simply that Seven’s quest for individuality and humanity is an inherently interesting topic, and the writers can come up with good material for such a topic relatively easily. In that sense, then, Seven is an asset. They’ve been telling a story about her, which has evolved and taken slow, believable turns. It’s what is known as an “arc.” We need more arcs.

-Jammer’s Reviews

Episode 26: Hope and Fear

Janeway hasn’t managed to decrypt the message from Starfleet (earlier in the season). When the crew meet a friendly/intelligent alien, Arturis (Ray Wise), w/ a talent for languages/patterns, she invites him to take a look at the code. He quickly decodes part of the code, which includes a message about a new Starfleet ship that uses slipstream technology (which could get them home in mos)! It has been dispatched on auto-pilot and is waiting nearby; the U.S.S. Dauntless is fully operational and the crew goes about familiarizing themselves w/ it. Torres and her Engineering team make a replica of the slipstream drive for Voyager, so they can bring it along. Kim eventually discovers a strange piece of alien technology inside Dauntless; this isn’t a Federation ship. It turns out that Arturis wants revenge on Voyager for helping the Borg defeat Species 8472; his race was assimilated by the Borg. He kidnaps Janeway and Seven, then enters the slipstream, traveling toward Borg space! Chakotay and crew follows in Voyager, but they may not be able to go too far.

[1] She [Janeway] and Seven have a heated argument about Seven’s remaining in the Delta Quadrant. This is the one that really feels like a mother arguing with her teenage daughter. The daughter (Seven) wants her independence, or so she thinks, saying she has outgrown humanity, but Janeway knows that, realistically, she couldn’t care for herself out there, and besides, this is really about her fear of not being accepted on Earth.

[2] For me, this episode epitomized what Voyager could have been. What made DS9, or even TNG in a limited way, intriguing was how what they did was permanent: they weren’t warping off at the end of the day, leaving whatever problem behind. Voyager was king of this. Arturis is a tragic character, and there could have been some excellent episodes built off the premise of people trying to exact revenge on Voyager because of their actions, or even helping Voyager.

-Excerpts from IMDB reviews

Basically, what we have here is a plot with pieces that are cobbled together out of unlikely coincidences and prior story events that have been twisted to fit the end result. And the reason for this end result to me seems motivated more by an obligatory need for the creators to revisit the “let’s get home” theme rather than to tell a real story.

…working in “Hope and Fear’s” favor is a great deal of stellar character work and some surprisingly effective closure. I liked, for instance, a lot of the motivation behind Arturis’ need for revenge (even if the methods of his revenge are extremely unlikely). The fact that Janeway’s negotiation with the Borg in “Scorpion” had negative consequences on other Delta Quadrant peoples is an interesting idea, and Arturis’ pointed accusation that Janeway can’t see beyond her own crew’s interests brings forth some valid observations. The use of the Borg collective as a dramatic device to bookend the season also works rather well.

Characteristically, this episode continues to capitalize on the growth of Seven as an individual. Seven fearing the prospect of living in a human society is both relevant and interesting. True, the repeated use of Seven continues to demonstrate how little the creative staff seems to care about the other characters, but it’s still great stuff in a vacuum.

-Jammer’s Reviews

“Star Trek: Voyager” (Season 3)

Introduction

This is considered (by long-time) fans as a transitional season. It’s not as directionless (or muddled) like much of S1 and S2. There is (some) continuity and more character development, though I wanted to see a lot more of Chakotay (Robert Beltran) and also some more of Tuvok (Tim Russ). Kes (though Jennifer Lien had talent) is on her way out; she doesn’t get much to do in S3. Jeri Ryan was brought on in S4 as a regular cast member. The writers/producers didn’t know what to do w/ Kes; they gave her some cool powers, then they didn’t follow-up. Capt. Janeway, (Kate Mulgrew), The Doctor (Robert Picardo), Torres (Roxann Dawson) and Paris (Robert Duncan McNeil) have been developed well (so far). S3 has more of the action/adventure element, which the producers envisioned in the start.

Season 3: Selected Episodes

Episode 1: Basics: Part II

With the Kazon-Nistrim in control of Voyager and nearly the entire crew marooned on a desert planet (w/ primitive humans, a huge serpent and a volcano), only Lt. Tom Paris (Robert Duncan McNeil), Crewman Lon Suder (Brad Dourif) and The Doctor (Robert Picardo) remain at-large to retake the ship. The Hanonian land eel (this didn’t age well- LOL) was the first alien creature on VOY created through CGI.

Suder: I’m gonna have to kill some of them.

The Doctor: It is possible. Violence might be required to retake the ship.

Suder: I’ve worked so… so hard over the last few months, to control the violent feelings. I’m almost at peace with myself. I mean, I see the day coming when I could be.

The Doctor: Mr. Suder, if Lieutenant Tuvok were here, I know he would tell you there are times when violence is required, to defend yourself, to defend your ship… to defend your crew.

Suder: Yes, there is a logical use for violence – for everyone else. For me, once it begins…

There is action, danger, and things get wrapped up (perhaps too neatly). As you’d expect, there are things that don’t make sense. This ep features the deaths of Seska (Martha Hackett would later return in other contexts), Suder (yup, I got a BIT emotional) and Hogan (Simon Billig). It was also the final time that the Kazon (AKA “discount Klingons”) appear, aside from flashbacks.

[Suder has been killed when sabotaging the ship’s phasers]

Tuvok: I offer you a Vulcan prayer, Mr. Suder. May your death bring you the peace you never found in life.

Episode 2: Flashback

Traveling close to a Class-17 nebula triggers a repressed memory in Tuvok, which can be a life-threatening condition to Vulcans. Janeway, as the closest thing to a trusted family member, agrees to mind-meld w/ Tuvok. Together they travel to when a 29 y.o. Ensign Tuvok served under Capt. Sulu aboard the U.S.S. Excelsior 80 yrs ago.

[Tuvok protests against Sulu’s decision to rescue his comrades]

Sulu: Ensign, you’re absolutely right, but you’re also absolutely wrong. You’ll find that more happens on the bridge of a starship than just carrying out orders and observing regulations. There’s a sense of loyalty to the men and women you serve with, a sense of family. Those two men on trial, I served with them for a long time. I owe them my life a dozen times over, and right now they’re in trouble and I’m gonna help them. Let the regulations be damned.

Tuvok: Sir, that is a most illogical line of reasoning.

Sulu: You better believe it.

We see TOS cast members George Takei and Grace Lee Whitney, this ep was considered for use as a pilot for a series involving the adventures of Sulu and Rand aboard the U.S.S. Excelsior. However, Paramount decided to produce Star Trek: Enterprise instead. This ep and DS9 (Trials and Tribble-ations) were produced as part of a 30th-anniversary celebration of Star Trek. Both stories involve a character who is old enough to remember the days of TOS (Dax and Tuvok). We also see Kang (Michael Ansara); he appeared also on TOS and DS9).

Episode 6: Remember

As Voyager transports friendly/telepathic aliens (Enarans) to their home world, Torres experiences passionate dreams w/ details like that of a holonovel. These are actually shared memories from one of the Enarans onboard, but who and why? The Doctor can block them, but Torres feels compelled to see them through. This was a recycled TNG script; it was originally meant as a Troi story. It’s a commentary on genocide (i.e. the Holocaust). Some viewers noted that it’s similar to the TNG ep Violations. The acting is done well (esp. by Dawson); we see veteran actor Bruce Davison and young Charles Esten (The Drew Carey Show, Whose Line is it Anyway? and Nashville).

Torres: I know that it’s easier for you to believe that I’m crazy or hallucinating, but this woman shared her life, her whole identity with me. I was with her every step of the way as she convinced herself that what she did – betraying the man she loved, playing her part in a massacre – that it was all somehow for the good of Enaran society. She showed me everything, no apologies, no request for forgiveness – just the truth.

Episodes 8 & 9: Future’s End, Parts I &II

Part I: An artificial temporal rift opens in front of Voyager. A Federation vessel (from the 29th century) emerges; Capt. Braxton says that Voyager somehow is responsible for a temporal disruption in his time that destroys Earth’s solar system. He begins to attack, hoping to change the future; Voyager disables Braxton’s time ship, and both ships are pulled back into the time rift! Braxton’s vessel is flung back to 1967 and Voyager travels to 1996. Voyager detects a warp signature in LA, so Janeway, Chakotay (w/ new hairdo), Paris, and Tuvok (in eclectic clothes) go to investigate. A SETI scientist, Rain Robinson (a young Sarah Silverman), who has been scanning for a particular radiation signature finds it emanating from the ship.

Part II: As the Voyager crew pit their 24th century tech against Starling’s stolen 29th century tech, Chakotay and Torres fall into the hands of paranoid white supremacists.

This is the first mention of a future Starfleet that monitors and repairs the timeline. Silverman (cute, quirky, and funny) was considered to join the regular cast for S4, after EP Brannon Braga enjoyed her work in these eps (which he co-wrote w/ Joe Menosky); eventually, he chose Jeri Ryan. The hippie-turned-baddie tech genius, Henry Starling, is played by Ed Begley, Jr. Janeway compares late ’90’s computers to “stone knives and bearskins” (calling back to what Spock said in TOS: The City on the Edge of Forever). Janeway and Chakotay showed had some nice camaraderie; Tuvok and Paris brought the humor; Kim and Torres back on the ship worked well.

Episode 11: The Q and the Grey

Chakotay [upon learning that Q wants to mate w/ Capt. Janeway]: I know I don’t have any right to feel this way, but this bothers the hell out of me.

Q returns to Voyager, saying that he wants to have a baby w/ Janeway- LOL! Janeway (of course) doesn’t buy it; the real issue that the death of Quinn has thrown the Q Continuum off-balance. Civil war has broken out, w/ the struggle adversely affecting the galaxy. Then there’s the other woman- Q’s former mate (Suzie Plakson)- to consider.

Q: [referring to Chakotay] I was wondering, Kathy, what could anyone possibly see in this big oaf anyway? Is it the tattoo? Because MINE’S BIGGER!

Janeway: Not big enough.

Yup, we find a d*ck joke on a Star Trek show- who would’ve thought!? The title uses the Civil War theme and plays upon the color of the North and South’s uniforms (blue and grey). It’s also a reference to the Civil War poem “The Blue and the Gray” by Francis Miles Finch. The Southern plantation drawing room is a redress of Janeway’s Jane Eyre-inspired holonovel. The Female Q’s comment re: admiring Klingon females is an in-joke; Plakson (a statuesque 6’2″) previously portrayed K’Ehleyr (Worf’s Klingon/Human ex on TNG).

Episode 12: Macrocosm

When Janeway and Neelix return to Voyager (after a first contact mission w/ the Tak Tak), they find the crew barely alive after being invaded by a microscopic life form which is growing to macroscopic proportions. This is the ep for all you action movie fans, or those who want a bit more action in ST universe. It’s unique and fun; we get to see a different (more tougher) side of Janeway.

Just a good, old-fashioned action-centric story, not so involved in techno-babble or completely overwhelmed in heady science (not that this bothers me, but sometimes less is more).

I love the way the commonplace sight of the ship can suddenly become such an creepy place when devoid of crew and with a mysterious sinister element lurking about unseen.

-Excerpts from IMDB reviews

Episode 15: Coda

Capt. Janeway finds herself living through several untimely death scenarios (w/ Chakotay) in a kind of time loop. Eventually, winding up aboard Voyager (in spirit form), her late father appears, ready to guide her into the afterlife. Is Janeway really dead or being deceived by an alien entity? 

Adm. Janeway: I’m trying to spare you unnecessary pain.

Capt. Janeway: My father would never act like this. He always believed I had to learn my own lessons, make my own mistakes. He never tried to shield me from life. Why would he try to shield me from death? You’re not my father.

This was made 3 yrs after the movie Groundhog Day set the standard for repeat-the-day-until-you-get-it-right time loop narratives. It had done it previously in TNG (Cause and Effect). There is some fine acting from Mulgrew and Beltran; the heavy emotion (from him) was never over-the-top.

Roxann Dawson’s speech during the wake and Robert Beltran’s scene when Janeway dies in his arms are notable standouts. Also, some of the chemistry between Janeway and Chakotay in the opening and closing are among the show’s best scenes…

-Jammer’s Reviews

Episode 16: Blood Fever

Tuvok: There is nothing logical about the pon farr. It is a time when instinct and emotion dominate over reason. It cannot be analyzed by the rational mind nor cured by conventional medicine. Anyone who has experienced it understands that it must simply be followed to its natural resolution.

Ensign Vorik (Alexander Enberg- son of writer/producer Jeri Taylor) undergoes the Vulcan mating drive (pon farr); the strong chemical imbalance affects Lt. Torres (who is human/Klingon) also, leading her to act irrationally. Trapped in a cave, Lt. Paris must try to reason w/ her (while respecting her and denying her advances).

Torres: See, I’ve picked up your scent, Tom. I’ve tasted your blood.

Paris: No. No. I’m your friend, and I have to watch out for you when your judgment’s been impaired. If you let these instincts take over now, you’ll hate yourself and me too for taking advantage of you. I won’t do that.

This ep was directed by Andrew Robinson (Garak- the “plain, simple tailor” on DS9). The issue of consent is handled quite well, considering the time period. There is some chemistry between McNeil and Dawson; obviously, producers want them as a romantic pair. At the end, Chakotay shows Janeway the remains of a dead Borg drone. This is the first appearance of any Borg since Star Trek: First Contact and the first appearance of the Borg in this series. Yikes, Voyager is nearing Borg space!

Episode 17: Unity

Still traveling through the Nekrit Expanse, Chakotay and Ensign Kaplan, answer a distress call from a colony (that incl. humans) on an alien planet. Caught between warring factions, Kaplan is killed and Chakotay gets seriously injured. Some colonists (former members of the Borg) can save Chakotay’s life, but he must join for a time w/ their “cooperative.” Voyager discovers a Borg cube dead in space!

The Cooperative: Open your mind to our thoughts and concentrate on getting well. Hear our voices. Open your mind to our thoughts. Our collective strength can heal you. You’re safe with us. Feel the connection. We’re with you. See who we are. Know us. You’re not alone. Our strength is your strength. We can overcome your pain. We welcome you into our thoughts. There’s nothing to fear. We won’t let you die. We’re all one circle, no beginning, no end.

Dr. Riley Frazier (Lori Hallier) says she was assimilated at Wolf 359 (see TNG: The Best of Both Worlds: Part II); this is also where Jennifer (Cmdr. Sisko’s wife) was killed in the DS9 series pilot. A Borg mechanical arm was one of the costume pieces previously been used in Star Trek: First Contact. The colony was mostly a redressed set; we saw it as the detention facility in The Chute and space station in Fair Trade. We get a new perspective on the Borg- they’re independent, not mindless automatons!

I’ve always liked the Borg… They’re the most interesting and fearsome villains that Star Trek has ever come up with—not just because they’re powerful and relentless, but because they’re determined to force you to join them, quashing your free will and independent thought.

At what cost is unity a positive option? Chakotay experiences first-hand the sorts of advantages and pleasures being connected with other minds can bring: tenfolds of knowledge, efficient communication of ideas, not to mention a closeness to those in the link that far exceeds what one could ever find outside the Collective.

-Jammer’s Reviews

Episode 23: Distant Origin

Gegen: [examining a human skull] Did your eyes see the planet of our origin, the true home of our race? Was it… beautiful? Was it covered by oceans, by sand? Were there nine moons above your head? Were there none?

Two Voth paleontologists find the remains of a Voyager crewman (possible Hogan, who died on the planet where the crew was exiled by the Kazon-Nistrim). DNA analysis of the remains shows links to their own DNA. While tracking and studying the Voyager crew, the scientists are discovered. They conclude that they’re an evolved species of dinosaur that left Earth more than 65M yrs ago! The lead scientist, Gegen (Henry Woronicz), is thrilled to be able to prove his “Distant Origin Theory.” The rulers of his society put Gegen on trial for heresy against the “doctrine” (that they originated here in the Delta Quadrant). The outcome of that trial threatens the Voyager crew also.

Minister Odala: We are not immigrants! I will not deny twenty million years of history and doctrine just because one insignificant saurian has a theory!

This ep is unusual, as it’s told partly from POV of a guest character, rather than one of the Voyager crew (who don’t appear until the second act). Several viewers noted that the Voth faces looked cool, but they’re hands could’ve been a lot better. Minister Odala (Concetta Tomei- a veteran of theater/TV) does a good job as the tough government official. Chakotay gets some nice scenes (thank goodness); he was under-used this season.

Gegen: [examining an Earth globe Chakotay has given him] Someday, every Voth will see this as home.

Chakotay: Someday. Eyes open.

Gegen: Eyes open.

Episode 25: Worst Case Scenario

Janeway: [on Tuvok’s refusal to continue his unfinished holo-novel] I’m more than just a captain. I’m the leader of a community, and communities need entertainment, culture, creative outlets. Since we’re not exactly privy to every new piece of music or holonovel that’s written back home, I think it’s only natural that we should start creating our own.

Many members of the Voyager crew participate in an engaging holo-program (uncovered by Torres) where Chakotay leads a mutiny. News gets to the captain; she is rather amused and wonders who could be the writer. Tuvok admits that it was his program- a training program for junior security officers. However, when Tuvok saw Starfleet and Maquis working well together, he decided not to complete it. When they open up the program to finish the story, Tuvok and Paris get trapped inside!

Paris: [on Seska] You should never have crossed her, Tuvok.

Tuvok: *She* has been dead for over a year now. There would have been no way to predict this turn of events.

Paris: I guess we should’ve known Seska wouldn’t let a little thing like death stop her from getting even.

This is a clever/fun ep (written by Kenneth Biller) where Seska- badder than ever- is back! She’s in her Bajoran form, but her hair is darker and styled partly up (common to Cardassians). Beltran and Hackett have fun being villains, but they still stay believable. Torres and Paris play the game differently, given their personalities, but both have a great time. There are meta moments and in-jokes (which those who are writers will esp. enjoy).

[1] What was interesting prior to the “stakes” is that there were no stakes in this episode. Just fictional characters in a fictional setting having very real conversations about temptation, ship gossip, creative approaches and what equates to cabin fever.

We’ve seen this story literally hundreds of times on various Star Trek series, but so rarely have we seen our characters just being people for a whole episode.

[2] The only tragic thing of this episode is that we get a glimpse of how exciting Voyager could have been as a show. I remember when the show was launched, the producers spoke of how it would be a show where “not everyone got along” because it would be a crew of both Maquis and Starfleet personnel. This notion quickly vanished in Season One and the Voyager crew became a “family” just like all the other Star Trek crew. “Worst Case Scenario” reveals another path which the show could have taken which certainly would have made it unique. A multi-episode story arc about a true hostile takeover might have made for a very interesting season indeed.

-Excerpt from IMDB review

Episode 26: Scorpion

Voyager’s third season comes to an end on a very good note… It’s about time.

…a very large, ambitious spectacle of an episode, and one could argue that this show happened because it had to happen—because the Delta Quadrant has remained so nondescript for so long now.

-Jammer’s Reviews

Voyager enters Borg space to find the Borg Collective on the losing end of war against a (new) alien race- Species 8472. While investigating a defeated Borg armada, Harry becomes infected. Janeway devises a risky plan to book safe passage through Borg space by working together w/ the Borg!

Janeway: This day was inevitable. We all knew it, and we’ve all tried to prepare ourselves for the challenge ahead, but at what point is the risk too great? At what point do we come about and retreat to friendly territory? Could the crew accept living out the rest of their lives in the Delta Quadrant? I keep looking to all these captains, my comrades in arms, but the truth is… I’m alone.

Chakotay: If that moment comes, we’ll face it together, and we’ll make the right decision. You’re not alone, Kathryn.

Janeway: [smiles] Three years ago I didn’t even know your name. Today I can’t imagine a day without you.

Whoa- this looks like a new show (which was done intentionally)! There is different lighting, new camera angles, new dramatic/tense music, and internal conflict between Janeway and Chakotay. A moment that works well is the discussion between Janeway and Chakotay concerning how Voyager is supposed to survive the Borg on its own. Voyager is alone; there is no Starfleet presence in the Delta Quadrant to back it up. How can one ship survive!?

This ep is the first time more than one Borg Cube is onscreen. The (creepy) pile of dismembered Borg on the disabled cube was a pile of Playmates Toys action figures. The Borg costumes, makeup appliances and set pieces were reused from Star Trek: First Contact; here the Borg look better (detailed) than on TNG. The CGI for this ep took 6 weeks; I thought it looked good (aside from Species 8472). By the end of the first act, the crew gets a glimpse of the Borg, as 15 cubes come from behind Voyager and pass it by—too fast to threaten the crew w/ assimilation. The sight is scary; Chakotay quietly murmuring “My God” sets the tone. What were the Borg running from? Later, passing through Borg wreckage, they realize those cubes have been destroyed!

[Chakotay has reservations about Janeway’s plan]

Janeway: Do you trust me, Chakotay?

Chakotay: That isn’t the issue.

Janeway: Oh, but it is. Only yesterday you were saying that we’d face this together, that you’d be at my side.

Chakotay: I still have to tell you what I believe. I’m no good to you if I don’t do that.

Janeway: I appreciate your insights, but the time for debate is over. I’ve made my decision. Now… do I have your support?

Chakotay: You’re the Captain; I’m the First Officer. I’ll follow your orders, but that doesn’t change my belief that we’re making a fatal mistake.

Janeway: [dejected] Then I guess I am alone after all. Dismissed.