Pick-up Lines for Trump’s America

The following lines were said by President Donald Trump:

They’re fighting for love. A lot of people are fighting for my love. 

All of the women flirted with me– consciously or unconsciously. That’s to be expected.

You have to think anyway, so why not think big?

I try to learn from the past, but I plan for the future by focusing exclusively on the present. That’s where the fun is.

The following lines were inspired by Anthony Scaramucci (“The Mooch”): 

I’ve done nothing wrong on my financial disclosures… 

I’m not a paranoiac. 

I would report to you directly… anyday. 

Girl, I loved your hair and makeup the last time I saw you. Your should keep doing that. 

I sometimes use colorful language, but will not give up the passionate fight for your heart.

The following lines were said by Ivanka Trump (advisor/daughter to The President): 

I personally love the word “curious.”

I believe that we each get one life and it’s up to us to live it to the fullest.

It’s enormously important to unplug and devote that time to each other. 

At a work happy hour, preferably: Cultivating authenticity is essential to creating strong bonds with your coworkers. 

On a business trip, perhaps meeting w/ a cute client: You have to be able to look the other guy in the eye and know that there is value in the deal on the other end, too – unless of course, you’re a onetime seller and just going for the gold.

The following lines were said by First Lady Melania Trump (a fomer model/immigrant): 

Happen to run into a dapper (stylish) man? Impress him!: I love my closet, and I always buy things that I love 100 percent. I’m very organized, and I like everything sorted by colors, even the shoes. It’s important to know exactly where everything is when you walk into the closet.

Spot a cutie on Capitol Hill? Try this one: I’m very political. I’m not political in public; I’m political at home.

I think the mistake some people make is they try to change the man they love after they get married. You cannot change a person.

I am not a “yes” person. No matter who you are married to, you still need to lead your life.

Other lines:

To a lawyer (or law student), preferably: Can you form an obstruction case? 

I’m not a drone, but I could surveil you any day. 

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Big Little Lies (HBO) starring Nicole Kidman, Reese Witherspoon, & Shailene Woodley

NOTE: This is a SPOILER-FREE review. 

[1] I don’t know why, but I found this show completely and utterly mesmerizing, all the way down to the music and cinematography. Everyone involved in this from top to bottom hit it out of the park.

[2] Give it a chance, as I haven’t been a fan of Nicole Kidman until now; she is amazing and such a talented actress in this series. 

[3] Extremely intelligently written, superb acting, great dialogues, characters on point, great music…

[4] I recommend everyone to go see it. It was an OUTSTANDING commentary touching on feminism, sisterhood, parenthood, love and compassion. 

-Excerpts from IMDB reviews

I was surprised by HOW much I liked this (limited) series. There MAY be a Season 2, BUT (from few things I’ve heard/read) don’t get your hopes up. This show is based on a book of the same title by an Australian novelist Liane Moriarty; however, the setting here is gorgeous, suburban, and liberal-minded town (Monterey, CA). The show focuses on the lives of several women (incl. homemakers, career women, single moms) whose children are attending 1st grade together at a public high school. Their husbands and (potential) partners are present, BUT secondary characters; the ladies (rare for TV) take the lead!  

The creator of HBO’s Big Little Lies is lawyer-turned-screenwriter David E. Kelley (Ally McBeal; Boston Legal; Chicago Hope, etc.)  Some of you know him as the long-time husband of actress Michelle Pfeiffer; they have two kids together. Nicole Kidman and Reese Witherspoon BOTH act and serve as producers of the show, as does Canadian director Jean-Marc Vallee (Dallas Buyers Club; Wild; The Young Victoria). I think Vallee has an eye for beauty, BUT is also NOT afraid to shy away from reality (incl. portraying dark/troubling moments in a natural fashion).

Madeline Mackenzie (Witherspoon) is an energetic, chatty, and VERY proud homemaker w/ two daughters- a 15 y.o. (recently growing distant) w/ her first husband and a 6 y.o. (who loves music) w/ her second husband, Ed (Adam Scott). They have a lovely beachfront home and are solidly upper middle-class, thanks to Ed’s successful IT business. Madeline works P/T at the local community theater. Her best friend is even wealthier; Celeste Wright (Kidman) is NOT only classically beautiful and elegant, she was a VERY successful lawyer who became a stay-at-home-mom (SAHM) to twin 6 y.o. boys. She is married to a somewhat younger business executive, Perry (Alexander Skarsgard), who travels often and likes to get his way. There is a new mom in town- Jane Chapman (Shailene Woodley); she is nice yet also reserved, still in her 20s, and has a sweet 6 y.o. son. Jane moved from a nearby town and is NOT from an affluent background; she is looking for a job in the accounting field.

Madeline takes an instant liking to Jane and introduces her to the town, their children’s school, and everyday dramas that result from interactions w/ fellow moms in the community. Career woman Renata Klein (Laura Dern) and Madeline are NOT afraid to let people know that they are frenemies (or nemesis?)- they lock horns often and BOTH have stubborn personalities. Renata knows that the SAHMs look at her differently; she serves on several company boards, yet also seeks to control things at her daughter’s school. One of the ONLY women who seems to be low-drama is Bonnie Carlson (Zoe Kravitz- daughter of singer Lenny Kravitz and actress Lisa Bonet). She is a free-spirited black woman (in her late 20s) who works as a yoga teacher; she is married to Madeline’s ex-husband, Nathan, w/ whom she has a 6 y.o. daughter.  

 

Rebecca (1940) starring Laurence Olivier & Joan Fontaine

INTRODUCTION

[1] The first thing that you notice is the outstanding cinematography. 

[2] …Joan Fontaine is just perfect as de Winter’s new bride. I can’t spot an unconvincing moment in her performance and can’t imagine any other actress in the role. 

[3] Her [Judith Anderson’s] presence is as dark and foreboding as that of the deceased Rebecca herself, and Fontaine is evidently cowed by her icy stare and unnervingly formal manner. The dynamics between the two actresses are wonderful. 

-Excerpts from various reviews on IMDB

Alfred Hitchcock often claimed that this film wasn’t his own. It belonged to Daphne Du Maurier because she had created such vivid characters and such a complex and exciting story. I disagree. You can’t deny his hallmark in all areas of this expertly crafted film. -Bette’s Classic Movie Blog

It is said that director Alfred Hitchcock encouraged the cast to shun Joan Fontaine (sister of Olivia de Havilland), even going as so far as to tell her “everyone here hates you” (in order to making her performance even more self-conscious and nervous in the lead role). Laurence Olivier was already upset w/ the fact that Vivien Leigh (his then-girlfriend) wasn’t chosen for the role. A gothic romance (inspired undoubtedly by Jane Eyre and Wuthering Heights), Rebecca is a suspenseful study in guilt and anxiety, exploring themes of love, obsession, and power. This is a moody (atmospheric) film which draws in the viewer w/ its music (by Franz Waxman), superb use of light and shadow, and (most importantly)- characters. The Grapes of Wrath was a fine film (and a great contender), but Rebecca won the Oscar. 

CHARACTERS

Narrator/Mrs. de Winter (Joan Fontaine): A shy, self-deprecating young woman working as “a paid companion” (an assistant/friend). Her mother and father (who she said people didn’t understand) are deceased, so she (as a single woman) has to make a way for herself in the world. Sometimes you will relate to her; at other times, feel sorry for her predicament. 

It’s just that I, well I’m, not the person men marry.

Maxim de Winter (Laurence Olivier): A middle-aged, handsome, aristocratic widower from Cornwall, where he owns an estate- Manderley. He can be witty/charming one moment, then angry/brooding the next (like Mr. Rochester); he is trying to forget his past.

Happiness is something I know nothing about.

Mrs. Van Hopper (Florence Bates): Rebecca’s wealthy/widowed/high-maintenance employer. The two ladies are vacationing in Monte Carlo at the start of the story. She is shocked when she discovers that her companion and Maxim are engaged; she asks:

Have you been doing anything you shouldn’t?

Mrs. Danvers (Judith Anderson): She seems to be as much a nanny-figure and a controlling mother figure, as a sinister housekeeper. She is creepily devoted to the memory of her former mistress, Rebecca; we are left to wonder just what sort of relationship they had. In the pivotal bedroom scene, she asks the second Mrs. de Winter:

Do you think the dead come back and watch the living?

Beatrice Lacy (Gladys Cooper): Maxim’s older sister who is surprised to meet the new Mrs. de Winter, but eventually warms up to her as a family member. She lives nearby w/ her somewhat comedic husband, Major Lacy (Nigel Bruce). Cooper is perhaps best known as the domineering mother to Bette Davis’ character in Now Voyager (1942); she also played Rex Harrison’s mother in My Fair Lady (1964). It’s nice to see her in a more lighthearted role here.

Jack Favell (George Sanders): A clever, charming cousin of Rebecca’s who we sense has a shady side. He shares secrets w/ Mrs. Danvers and feels contempt for Maxim. Jack acts like he feels sorry for the new Mrs. de Winter when he meets her by chance. Sanders has a pivotal role in All About Eve (1950), where I first noticed him and became a big fan. He was in another (gothic-inspired) film- The Ghost and Mrs. Muir starring Rex Harrison and Gene Tierney. 

Frank Crawley (Reginald Denny): The manager of the Maderley estate; he is cordial to everyone in the household, including the new mistress. This is NOT the type of guy who makes (or likes) drama, unlike others in this tale.

Colonel Julyan (C. Aubrey Smith): He is a no-nonsense elderly aristocrat in charge of the court case (inquest). This actor played Mr. Laurence in Little Women (1949) starring Elizabeth Taylor and Janet Leigh (another of Hitch’s players).

Dr. Baker (Leo G. Carroll): He is a medical doctor in London. This prolific character actor appeared in several of Hitch’s films: Suspicion (1941), Spellbound (1945), Strangers on a Train (1951), and North by Northwest (1959).

THEMES

Food

Mrs. de Winter has trouble with eating. The long lonely dining room table separates her and her husband. Food is heaped up around characters: Jack tears into cold chicken, Mrs Van Hopper wolfs down chocolates, and “Oh! What a plateful!” exclaims Beatrice. 

Clothing & Hair

At the beginning, Fontaine’s character is dressed like she made terrible selections at a Macy’s basement sale. Later, as she tries to fill the role of the “great lady”… her clothes always appear too big and out of character. Note the black evening dress with the absurdly large flowers across the front and the overwhelming gown at the costume ball. -Excerpt from IMDB review

Mrs. de Winter is repeatedly subjected to adverse comments on her hair. When she tries for a new more sophisticated look, Maxim hates it. Hair (confined, unbound, luxurious, neglected) is mentioned several times in the film. We hear that Rebecca had long dark hair.  

Scent

Scent is as suspect and degenerate as all of Rebecca’s luxuries: a trap, a snare and a betrayal. -Les Senteurs blog

Mrs. de Winter talks of storing up her memories like perfume. Maxim comments that those little bottles “sometimes contain demons that have a way of popping out at you just as you’re trying most desperately to forget.” He prefers his new bride to smell natural. 

Innocence 

He had a theory that if you should find one perfect thing, or place or person, you should stick to it. Do you think that’s very silly? -The narrator says about her father to Maxim

The main thing that attracts Maxim to the narrator is her innocence (including her inexperience w/ men, unassuming manners, and youth). When she woefully wishes she were older and elegantly dressed, Maxim stops the car and solemnly replies: “Please promise me never to wear black satin or pearls… or to be 36 years old.” We can sense that Maxim has emotional baggage, but the second Mrs. de Winter doesn’t see the warning signs, or she overlooks them, being so much in love.