Magic Town (1947) starring James Stewart & Jane Wyman

Very Frank Capra-like (not surprisingly since screenwriter Robert Riskin collaborated with Capra numerous times)…

If you liked James Stewart in “It’s a Wonderful Life” and “The Philadelphia Story,” this one’s for you.

This is one of those “just sit back and enjoy” pictures that isn’t particularly deep, but that is charming and great fun to watch.

…this film has lots of treasures in the performances, dialogue, physical comedy and rich diversity home spun Americana characters. I recommend this to all fans of the Capra-Riskin genre.

This movie is classic Jimmy Stewart. He is terrific, showing his ability to seamlessly mix comedy with drama.

Interestingly, the town people… were asked whether they thought a woman could function satisfactorily as president. 79% responded “yes.” This was considered an outrageous result.

-Excerpts from IMDB reviews

In this William Wyler directed film, Jimmy Stewart plays Lawrence “Rip” Smith, an NYC opinion pollster in search of a small town whose opinions reflect those of the U.S. as a whole. When he finds out that Grandview is such a place, he seizes his opportunity to make money (since his office is failing), and heads off to this town. Rip interrupts a conference held by the mayor and convinces him and his committee not to change the town. He’s smooth-talker putting on a facade; he appears boyish, drawling, folksy, and idealistic- the usual Stewart character.

Rip (along w/ Donald Meek and Ned Sparks- veteran character actors) poses as an insurance agent. He even starts coaching the basketball team at the H.S. where his old war buddy teaches. Rip also takes an interest in the newspaper editor, Mary Peterman (Jane Wyman), who is standoffish at first. After her father died, she wanted to keep his legacy going by building a new high school and civic center (yet was rebuffed by the town council).

In one funny scene in a classroom, Rip loudly recites Charge of the Light Brigade while Mary (more subdued) recites Hiawatha. An elderly janitor sees them and begins quoting Romeo’s balcony scene from Shakespeare. Gary Fishgall, who wrote a biography of Stewart, pointed out that the actor decided to use exaggerated facial expressions and pieces of slapstick (I liked when he tripped going up some stairs while saying “I can be tough.”) One viewer commented that Stewart might’ve been influenced by the Three Stooges; he says “Wise guy, huh?” and “What kind of a lamebrain do you think I am?”

Some of Riskin’s films were playing at AFI in April, but I discovered this film on YouTube. I thought Stewart and Wyman had very sweet and playful chemistry; they made a cute couple. Though Stewart’s character isn’t always 100% honest, you can’t help but like him (b/c he’s a decent man at heart).

Here is the full movie:

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