Movie Review: “Arranged”

arranged_dvd

This is a 2007 indie film I came across at Blockbuster 2 wks ago.   The movie was shot in NY and NJ with unknown/little known actors.  This film is based partly on the experiences of one of its producers- an Orthodox Jewish woman.  It’s a refreshing picture about how modernity AND tradtion can coexist in America. 

 

arranged_nasira

The film follows  two smart/articulate/pretty young women recently out of college, Rochel (an Orthodox American Jew) and Nasira (a Syrian American Muslim).  Both ladies come from caring traditional families, work at a public school in Brooklyn, and are in the process of getting arranged marriages.

 

 

arranged_2gals

Rochel (Zoe Lister Jones) and Nasira (Francis Benhamou) have more in common than meets the eye, and they eventually become good friends.  Their friendship causes many raised eyebrows, but the girls grow to rely on each other.  The dialogue is very realistic and the main characters are enjoyable to watch.  I learned a few things while watching this movie, too. You should check it out, if it’s available in your area!

 

 

Arranged at Internet Movie Database: 

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0848542/

 

The Making of Arranged:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ioQkzYk3No8

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2 thoughts on “Movie Review: “Arranged”

  1. Yes, I also thought it was a “happily ever after” type of ending, BUT I have seen some women like this in NYC (& a few other states, too). In general, arranged marriages DO turn out pretty well (from what I’ve observed in Bangladeshi American Muslim communities), BUT there are ALWAYS a FEW horror stories. Some people fall in love (over time), while others have to just struggle through it/get by with what was chosen/decided for them. Some folk are finding ways to fix their own marriages these days, too!

  2. I just saw this film and also think its a poignant and thoughtful expose of the trials and tribulations of trying to splice modernity and tradition in ones life. Perhaps the ending was too ‘happy ever after’ but overall a sensitive portrayal about the importance of reaching across differences.

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